The Choice Effect

Living Authentically: Jess Marie's Journey from Confinement to Freedom

October 03, 2023 Sonny Von Cleveland Season 1 Episode 11
The Choice Effect
Living Authentically: Jess Marie's Journey from Confinement to Freedom
The Choice Effect +
Become a supporter of the show!
Starting at $3/month
Support
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Ever found yourself stuck in a relationship that’s lost its spark but you don't know how to escape? Our guest today, Jess Marie, made the courageous decision to step out of a 13-year relationship, despite societal pressures and the doubts of those around her. As she shares her journey of self-discovery and the hurdles she faced, you'll be inspired by her testament to choosing oneself. 

Venturing beyond individual experiences, we explore societal factors that often keep us tethered to unsatisfying relationships. We critically examine religious mindsets that advocate for a mentality of "until death do us part" and discuss the importance of changing one's opinion and making decisions that bring joy. The conversation takes a turn when Jess shares her experiences working with young homeless individuals, a role that's both challenging and rewarding. 

But it's not all about the struggles; we also delve into the power of setting goals and self-kindness. Jess talks about how setting boundaries and daily goals has impacted her life, offering practical insights that you can incorporate in your journey. We also touch upon her philanthropic work and podcast dedicated to shedding light on topics with societal stigmas. Tune in for hard-won wisdom on personal growth and choosing oneself for a happier life.

Detailing the promotion of Hey White Boy - Conversations Of Redemption

Support the show

Thank you for joining us on the Choice Effect Podcast. This is Sonny Von Cleveland, reminding you that every challenge is an opportunity for transformation. Your past doesn't define you; your choices do. Let's keep inspiring, healing, and choosing paths that lead to our best selves. Until next time, stay empowered and remember: You have the power to change your story.

Follow me on social media and get involved!!

https://linktr.ee/sonnyvoncleveland

Sonny Von Cleveland:

Today we have a truly extraordinary guest, jess Marie. She's a single mom, a compassionate worker serving the homeless population, and the voice behind an uplifting podcast aimed at breaking down stigmas and inspiring hope. Jess Marie, welcome to the Choice Effect.

Jess Marie:

Thank you so much for having me. I'm so excited to be here.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

And how are you today?

Jess Marie:

I'm good. How are you?

Sonny Von Cleveland:

I'm doing pretty good. I can't complain. It's a beautiful day in sunny Palm Springs, california. We're out of the summer, which is nice, and it's kind of weird for an East Coaster to hear.

Jess Marie:

We're out of summer. That's nice. What does that look like? Is that still hot?

Sonny Von Cleveland:

No, no, it's beautiful. It's probably 85, 90 degrees out and it's paradise, which is why we live here nine months out of the year. But that's where it's really really bad. It's really hot. So thankfully that's gone and we are back into the beautiful time. Jess Marie, you are in New York, correct?

Jess Marie:

I am, and it is not 85 degrees in New York right now, which I wish it was, because I love warm weather. I don't know why I live in New York, but yeah, three months out of the year it's beautiful there.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

Yeah, exactly, Exactly. It's the exact opposite of us West Coasters.

Jess Marie:

Yeah, it's complete opposite.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

Let's kick things off discussing your life altering decision. You made a choice to leave a nearly 13 year long relationship. That's a long time to be with somebody. What prompted this monumental decision in your life?

Jess Marie:

It is a very long time to be with someone, but things were not good in this relationship in many different areas. There was a lot of unhealthy, toxic things going on and I am raising a son who was witness to a lot of the stuff that was happening in this relationship and I had found out that there was another person in this in his life. For me, that was kind of like the final straw. Lots of people put up with stuff like that. Had that been the only thing going on, I may have considered trying to work through it, but we were trying to do that anyway. But it turned out I was the only one who was actually trying and wasn't.

Jess Marie:

So, exactly, and you can't make something work when you're the only person trying to fix it.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

So it's a team effort at the end of the day.

Jess Marie:

Yes, absolutely, absolutely. So when I discovered that, I decided that that was it for me. I was, I was done. So that was the choice. That kind of threw my life into a path that I didn't expect to be living, because in my mind, I wanted us to be a family forever and to raise our son together, but it just wasn't in the cards and, like I said, I was raising a son and he needs to know what a healthy relationship looks like, how you're supposed to treat the person that you're in a relationship with, and what is and isn't okay to put up with and not put up with.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

And I think I think that that's monumentally important that if, when you have kids, you have to lead by example, kids they don't listen, they watch, and so what you say and what you do have to be consistent, otherwise you're going to create a dichotomy inside the mind of the child and that can be destructive going up. Most decisions of this magnitude come with immediate challenges and obstacles. It seems that you didn't face any of those, at least not ones that were immediately apparent, and you talk about the impact this decision had on your life and the days and weeks following it.

Jess Marie:

It was, it really was, and I feel like, I think in my mind I saw it coming. So when it all initially kind of unfolded, I wasn't. I wasn't upset, which probably sounds crazy. Because you think you're in a relationship with someone for that long, how are you not upset?

Sonny Von Cleveland:

Right.

Jess Marie:

I felt like what you say. I was like relieved. It felt like a huge weight had been lifted off of my shoulders and I could breathe again because I didn't have to deal with all of the stress and the difficulties and all of that negative stuff that came with staying when I was in that relationship. So it was very free. And you know, I think a lot of the people around me kind of they were happy for me that I finally made that decision to choose me, but I also think they were a little skeptical, like this isn't gonna last yeah, with any significant life choice, the people around you Often have their own opinions and reactions to these types of things.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

How did your family and your friends and your colleagues react to your decisions? Where you met with support, shock resistance?

Jess Marie:

I. There was definitely some shock because, like I said, I mean people who were close to me kind of knew the inside things that were going on and they knew where I was at. But so there was support, but there was that shock of like wow, she actually, she actually did it this time, she actually ended it, and I do think that there was there was that doubt that you know this isn't gonna last. She's gonna Be in this mindset for a couple weeks and then she'll be right back to where she was before. So I mean I've had, even still now, like my friends that are still friends with me, that I was friends with them, who have said, like I'm really proud of you, that you stuck with your decision and essentially chose you, and I continue to do that. Yeah, I mean it's it's.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

It's it's pretty inspiring to see when you have A close friends and associates that that walk through the fire with you, right, because it's, even if you you did feel liberated and you felt you weren't Destitute about the situation there's still. It's not an easy transition, right. So I mean, it's gonna be difficult and it's good to have people that are with you, and I would imagine that the people that are close to your family Must have seen something coming. It's like like it just came out of nowhere. It's. It seems that this choice has been incredibly transformative for you, strengthening your independence and your resilience.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

Can you speak a little more on how this decision is shaped? Who you are today? Yes, so it definitely has Molded me more into the person that I am now.

Jess Marie:

I I've chosen to put myself first. I've chosen to put myself first, which is not something that I was doing in that relationship. I was too focused on making someone else happy instead of making myself happy, and over the last three years, I've realized that you have to put yourself first and make yourself happy first before you make anybody else happy. So that's been, you know, that's been a really big thing for me and just kind of like living in a relationship, um, and just kind of like living my life for me and not for other people, because you know, we have all of these ideas and conceptions about what life and what relationships and families and all that are supposed to look like, but it's okay for them to not look that way. So that's been something that I've really like reminded myself, um, and then, in turn, kind of tried to remind other people, because you don't have to stay stuck somewhere.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

That is not healthy. And I think I think that's one of the the most profound Realizations that someone can come to is that you don't have to remain where you are. Why do you think it's so difficult for people to grasp that concept? I I find it fascinating that that when you get to that point, people realize, well damn, I should have been doing this the whole time. I realized, right, right. So what do you think it is that that Locks somebody out of that mindset, knowing that that decision is there at all times?

Jess Marie:

I think there's a couple things. The first thing that comes to mind is, like society's perceptions of Like, even when times are tough, like you have to stick with that person and figure out a way to make it work. Because, like a perfect example, if you think my parents are still married to this day They've been married for 43 years so, like when my parents were growing up and getting married, that's what people did. They stayed together even when stuff got hard.

Jess Marie:

Like if you think about you know wedding vows that people take it's till death, do us part through sickness and health, like all of all of these things like the worst of the worst, but sometimes Like the worst of the worst is really freaking bad and you don't you don't have to stay just because you took those vows. So I definitely think that that's a part of it, but I also think too, that sometimes People have this idea that if they stay, it will get better. Sure and like how long do you wait for it to get better?

Sonny Von Cleveland:

And and I I think there's a societal Influence in there as well right Like we, we're. We're so raised in this, this country in particular. I don't have much experience in other countries.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

Yeah but we're raised with this, this overreaching Thought process that we, you, when you take those vows, it's forever. And I think and I mean I I'm straying a little off the path, but I think that that's that is because of religious institutions, at the end of the day, that that brought in that concept, because it hasn't always been a ubiquitous mindset Throughout history. We see that in the polygamy religions and things like that. But how do you think that we, we can combat that, that societal mindset that, because I I think that's what keeps people stuck in those places. It's a huge contributing factor.

Jess Marie:

Absolutely. And how do you?

Sonny Von Cleveland:

think that. How do you think we go about battling that?

Jess Marie:

I think more people need to talk about the fact that it's okay to leave a situation if you're not happy and Truthfully like that.

Jess Marie:

I'm not just even talking about relationships, I'm talking about any type of situation that makes you unhappy because, again, people feel like if they commit to something, that they have to commit to it forever a job, a relationship, whatever, whatever the case may be and it doesn't have to be forever. It's okay to change your mind about things and I think that more people need to hear that, because so many times people are told like well, you decided to do this, so like you should stay and stick it out and push through and there's.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

There's so many aspects to that that I think contribute to that right, like the comfortable pain that that people get accustomed to, like there's certain amounts of Unhappiness and pain that we accept because we have become comfortable in that pain. So we, we, we know, like in a job that you hate, right, you, you'll stay in that job that you hate because it pays your bills and you, you know what to expect. I know when I go to work, this is gonna happen, this is gonna happen. This level of unhappiness is gonna be in my life, but it's okay because it's a means to an end and and and I think people neglect to understand that Staying in that it becomes habit, right, and when you wouldn't have, it becomes a characteristic, and a characteristic becomes a personality.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

And so when they stay in that mindset, they, they and I mean some people do it their whole life and they don't realize it until they're 65 and they're about to retire and they're like I wish I would have done this, this, this, in my life. And how does that work for you? I like, how do, how do you approach the decision-making process in your life, just on a normal level, for everyday, normal decisions, and is that? Is that in conjunction with the way you make big decisions? I?

Jess Marie:

Think it is, and I mean sometimes. I mean people on the outside might think that some of my decisions are, I don't maybe irresponsible or Genius but here's the thing, and this.

Jess Marie:

This may sound very cliche, but this is. This is how I live my life. I I'm only here For a certain amount of time. I don't know when that time is gonna end, but I am not gonna wake up every morning and be miserable or make decisions because I think somebody else Wants me to make that decision. I did something I want to do and I have the means to do it and the means to figure it out. I'm gonna do it and I don't care what anybody else.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

Absolutely, and I think that people have to to try to embrace that philosophy more. Right. When we, when we have the ability to step outside of of ourselves and look at external perceptions, that's where I think most people Hit a roadblock in life to happiness is yeah, yeah, that sense of fear is so powerful it literally will control everything that you do in life. Right?

Jess Marie:

Absolutely yeah, and I spent way too much of my life waking up being miserable and being unhappy and not Finding the positivity in things. And I don't. I don't live my life like that anymore. And I mean, granted, I still wake up some days and I'm in a bad mood, but when I feel like that now I Will try my damnedest to do whatever I can to shake off whatever that feeling is, because I don't like feeling that way anymore, like it was that it was normal for me at one point in time to just wake up and be miserable and everything, everything was bad and all of these negative things were happening and that's just what it was and I just had to deal with it. But I don't. I don't do that anymore when there are those bad things that happen, because bad things do happen in life. That's just part of life. Like, my life is not sunshine and roses every day, but I try my hardest to find the positivity, even in the negative moments, which I know drives some of the people are on me crazy, but that's.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

I think that's just should be a goal of everybody's life, right silver.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

It's always try to find it. Hindsight is absolutely 2020. So, if you, can we look back in those moments when you lived. I mean, you were in that for years that you were living that miserable, unhappy existence. What do you think if you look back and analyze a little bit? What were you telling yourselves in yourself in those moments when you would wake up miserable or angry? What was the? What was the, the excuse or the justification that you gave yourself Like, well, it's okay.

Jess Marie:

So the story that I always share is that growing up, my parents always had this saying that if they didn't have bad luck, they wouldn't have any luck. So I kind of I feel like I adopted that same mindset without even maybe realizing that I had adopted it because it was just like One bad thing and not even like horrible things all the time. I mean, granted, there were some Awful things mixed in with like just normal every day, but it really was like this bad thing happened. Oh, that's just because that's just our luck, like that's just what happens to us, like we don't have good luck. So I think in a sense that's how I normalized. It was just like these are the cards that I've been dealt and I have to live with it, which isn't true.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

It's not true.

Jess Marie:

You don't have to just live with it.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

Because, looking back, is there anything that you would have done differently regarding the choice? Because your perspective of not wanting or not waiting for a reason to leave a relationship or anything is compelling and I think it's something that could resonate with many of our listeners. Is there anything you would have done differently?

Jess Marie:

So here's the thing. I would love to be able to answer that question and say that I would have done this differently. I would have done that differently. The only thing I can say about that is that I do wish I had left sooner. However, I feel like I went through everything that I needed to go through to get me to where I am now, so now I can sit here and say I do wish I had left sooner, because I could have been living this life that I'm living now, years before I actually was, but at the same time, I went through it the way I was supposed to go through it, so that I could learn the lessons I needed to learn and be here where I am now in life.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

Exactly, and I think everything happens when it's supposed to, because had you left earlier, you may have missed out on a different opportunity or something that would have changed.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

I do think that we endure whatever life or whatever circumstances we do because that's just the way it was supposed to play out. Like I look back at my life quite a bit and, as most people know, I did 18 years in the penitentiary and people often ask me you wouldn't go back and change that. Had I not done that, I would have missed the life altering opportunity to be mentored by a very wise dude that helped set my life on the path that it was, and I'm so happy where I'm at in my life right now. Why would I go back and change it? I've already gone through the suffering and all of that and there's no point in going back to change that. Do you ever look back and think about the misery and the suffering and try to analyze some of the lessons that came from that and how you can apply that to future endeavors or decisions that you might come across?

Jess Marie:

I do, and I think sometimes that's a disservice to other people, because there's a lot of stuff that I don't put up with anymore, like if it reminds me or it's similar to some of the stuff that I went through. In that situation I'm like nope, I'm good, I'm going to stay over here, you stay over there.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

So Well, those are boundaries. And I don't think there's anything wrong with having healthy boundaries. In fact, I think it's imperative. I think you have to have healthy boundaries because if you don't, then you're just willing to accept whatever, and being in that state of mind doesn't allow you to manifest or hardwire the life that you want, because you're just accepting so many things.

Jess Marie:

Right.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

Right. So how would you advise somebody that is facing a similar situation or in the same crossroads in their life? Right now, your point of listening to one's heart and not living for others is particularly powerful. How would you advise someone that's in a similar situation?

Jess Marie:

I think the thing that comes to mind for me is stop and ask yourself is this how you want to continue living your life? Think about what you want your life to look like ideally. The picture perfect life Is this it, and obviously nothing is going to be picture perfect, but I guarantee you, if you stop for a second and imagine what you would like your life to look like, all of that negativity and toxicity and whatever else is going on isn't going to be part of whatever you're envisioning.

Jess Marie:

So, remember that and then stop and think about what you need to do to get to that point. And it's not going to be easy, it's not going to happen overnight. It's not like flipping a light switch and everything just immediately gets better and everything goes away. But really stop and think about if that's what you want your life to look like. And one other quick thing is I like to pose this question to my friends sometimes when they come to me with stuff that they're going through. I ask them if I was coming to you with this problem, what would you tell me?

Sonny Von Cleveland:

Ooh, that's a good way to flip the narrative, because once they say that, then they kind of have to take their own advice. They don't have to, but they should.

Jess Marie:

They don't have to, but they should.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

Right, you should definitely take your own advice when you give it, and I think that that's a really profound way of getting someone to look at that. I never thought of that before myself. Actually, what advice would you give to yourself if you were me?

Jess Marie:

Because typically it's not the same, like you're not telling yourself the same thing that you would tell your friend if they came to you with that same problem.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

Right, yeah, that's a wonderful way to look at things. And again, it invokes thought. It makes people stop and think and at least they might be able to garner something from that by thinking that way. Have there been any books or resources or individuals who are particularly influential in guiding your decision or supporting you afterwards throughout this journey?

Jess Marie:

So there's two, three maybe, people. The first is and I talk about her a lot when people ask me this question I have a really good friend. Her name is Lisa and we were friends through middle school, high school, through my 20s. She passed away. It will be seven years, I think, in October, and she was in a hospice home and so she knew her time was coming to an end. She knew that she only had a limited amount of time here, but she woke up every single day, grateful that she woke up that day, and that really helped me remember that every single day I wake up there's something to be grateful for, even if it is just waking up that day. If nothing else good happens that day, you still woke up and that's something to be grateful for. So she has really helped me focus on finding the gratitude and the things to be grateful for.

Jess Marie:

And then to kind of go off of that, my cousin and his wife. They used to do they don't anymore, but they used to do this daily Facebook live. Every day it was called the Daily Gig, and Gig stood for gratitude, inspiration and goal. So every day for like a year straight they would do this video, they would say something. They were grateful for, something that inspired them to like an inspirational quote or something, and then they would set a goal for the day. So I started watching their videos every morning and then I started writing them down and I still. They haven't done this this Daily Gig in over a year now, but I still get up every morning and I have my journal that I write these things down every single day and that has been a huge help to remind me again that there's always something to be grateful for, and I like setting a goal for myself for the day Again, even something simple like making the bed Like just something.

Jess Marie:

It doesn't have to be some huge, profound goal to set for the day, but the nice thing about that is that when I read back over it the next day, this sense of what's the word I can't even think of the word that I'm trying to trying to think of right now, but like of accomplishing the goal that I set for myself the day before. And granted, there are times when I don't accomplish that goal, and that's also an important reminder, because you're not always going to do everything that you set out to do for yourself in a day, and that's okay. So 100%.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

I think it's very important to remember to be kind and forgiving to yourself. Sometimes you fail, but so did Edison, so did Michael Jordan, so every successful person in the world failed their way to success, and so it's what's important is getting up and continuing on that path. So tell us about some of the awesome parts of your life now, now that you've made that decision and you broke away from that. How did that open up your life to new experiences and new things? And tell us about some of the stuff that you do.

Jess Marie:

So I think probably one of the biggest things that has happened since that relationship ended I finally bought a house, which is something I kind of thought would never happen, and Elevating accomplishment.

Jess Marie:

I mean, I think so, and it was big for me in a lot of ways because my parents especially said to me multiple times how proud they were of me, which, looking back, I don't feel like I heard that a lot growing up. So to hear them and even other people around me say that they were proud of me because I was a single mom At the time only worked one job Now I have like three jobs that I work but just hearing them say things like I'm proud of you, you're an inspiration, that for me was like wow, I don't think this would have happened, and even if it did, it probably wouldn't have been the same type of reaction from the people around me.

Jess Marie:

So I mean, that was probably the biggest one, but then I really I just I think the other thing is reminding myself and trying to remind the other people around me about finding the things to be grateful for in life, even the lessons, because you know the hard things, because there are lessons in those hard things, and that's what makes them worth it.

Jess Marie:

That's what makes them worth it. So I mean, you know, there was the house I did. I ended up getting a new car, which like a brand new car, which is something that I never. I always thought maybe someday I'll have a brand new car, but in the moment that it happened I wasn't expecting it to happen. So that happened. You know, the podcast has started.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

Tell us about this, tell us about your podcast in the philanthropy work you do with the homeless.

Jess Marie:

So the podcast, as you mentioned is, it focuses on topics that typically have stigmas attached to them, mostly like negative stigmas that are placed from outside of yourself. Because there are so many of them with so many different topics, and I find that people don't talk about things because they're afraid of the judgment from other people, because of something that they may have experienced or something that they are going through or that they think that no one else has experienced, whatever that is they're talking about.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

Right, we all feel like our trauma is individual, like it's unique. No one else has ever gone through this.

Jess Marie:

Right, and that couldn't be further from the truth. So I started the podcast as a way to, you know, share some of my own struggles that I've been through, but then to also give people a platform to share their stories too and let people know how they've overcome those things, so that maybe that person listening who thinks I'm the only one who's going through this and there's no way I can get out of this has some hope in knowing that you absolutely can and things are gonna be better on the other side.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

Absolutely. It's a beautiful podcast and we'll definitely pop a link. Thank you and plug all that in. Now tell me about what you do with the homeless. You do some work with homeless people.

Jess Marie:

I do I actually. So my full-time job is I'm a case, a senior case worker in the homeless unit in my county. So I work mainly with homeless families who are sheltered by our department. You know, do like a safety assessment with them and then we connect them to services to help get them housed. But then I also have two part-time jobs, both also in that same area. So the one is a men's homeless shelter and then the other is a homeless shelter for like young teens or teens and young adults, like runaway teens and stuff like that. So it's all kind of connected.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

Yeah, and what do you find is the biggest challenge? Working with runaway teens and young adults?

Jess Marie:

I think the biggest challenge with that particular population is I mean, I can remember being that age too. I feel like at that age we think we know everything and it's hard sometimes for them to hear our advice and assistance and take it as that, like that we're trying to help them. You know, sometimes I think people in that age range feel like we're trying to tell them what to do instead of like guiding them on the path to what will help them get to where they need to be. So I think that's probably one of the biggest struggles with that particular population.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

Sure, and do you have some success stories from some of the clients that you work with? Have you seen some changes come around, where they've gone from homeless to successful?

Jess Marie:

There have been. Yeah, and I would love to say that there's tons of stories like that to share, but the few that there are it's nice to see them after. And then they thank you and they are happy to share where they are and what they're doing in life now. And it's nice to hear that, because in the social services field in particular, it's kind of a thankless job. You don't often get recognized for the things that you do. So when you hear those stories from people and see them doing better, in a better position, it does feel nice because you actually feel like you've done something, which is the whole point, like you're making a difference in accomplishing things.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

It's a beautiful story. Well, I think your journey is phenomenal. I think the story is unique and I think what you do is inspirational for people. I think people that listen to this and may find themselves on a similar pathway they might gain some inspiration from what young Jess Marie does, and I like that. Is there anything you'd like to share that we haven't covered? Something you believe is essential for our audience to know to fully grasp the impact of your story?

Jess Marie:

The one thing I can say is and it sounds so simple when you say it, but it really can have a profound impact is to just be kind and be kind to yourself and to other people, and that's actually how I close out my podcast at the end is reminding people because it's not just important to be kind to other people, you have to be kind to yourself too. Give yourself grace where all human, we all make mistakes. None of us are perfect and nobody is better than the next person. We are all here. We're all imperfect, we're all making mistakes and we really have to remember that, because you learn from the mistakes that you make and it's okay to make those mistakes.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

I think I've come to find that most people through this podcast, I've come to find that most people that are in the podcast, the podcasting realm, we all think the same way. A lot of us think the same way. Like it is really simple just be nice, be nice to people around you, be nice to yourself, be forgiving to yourself. Understand that nobody has a rule book, nobody came here with a guidebook on this is how to be a human and there's what we call that. That is there. There's societal expectations, but that changes a biography right. There's different cultures and different cultures have different applications for the way that one should walk through life. And I think, in my personal opinion, I think traveling when you turn 18 and graduate high school, you should be shipped on a bus to a some remote country, somewhere with nothing but a fricking backpack and say good luck and you have to stay there for a year, because I think exposing yourself to different diversity and different cultures I think is such a huge learning curve for people. But I think we're all on the same page and I think we all have that goal to try to teach that to other people, to help people to understand like, hey, here's the simple fix on how to live a happy life. Even though it's not always easy and it's not going to be easy, there's still a very simplistic path to get to it, and I think it's credible. Well, it's been an absolute honor to have you here on the Choice Effect, and your story is a testament to the transformative power of fearless decision making. So thank you so much for taking your time to come and talk with me and share your story.

Jess Marie:

Thank you so much for having me.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

I really, really appreciate being here, Is there any place that they can find you that our listeners can do more research on Jess Marie and what the hell was that? I don't know what that was, I'm just spooked the crap out of me. Is there any place that somebody can find you? Go ahead and plug away. Drop some plugs.

Jess Marie:

Yes, thank you. So the podcast is available on Apple, spotify, iheartradio, amazon Music and it is on the platform Podbean. And then I do have an Instagram for the podcast. It's unapologetically underscore, overcoming, and the Facebook is unapologetically overcoming the podcast.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

I love it. We will post those as well in the show description and you guys can go over there and follow Jess and see all the awesome stuff that she is doing in her life to help make the world around her a little bit brighter and better. Thank you for your time and thank you for making the choice that you've made in your life, cause it's inspirational and it's gonna help a lot of people. Thank you so much, jess.

Jess Marie:

Thank you.

Transformative Choice
Breaking Free From Societal Mindsets
Reflections on Endurance and Finding Gratitude
Gratitude and Overcoming Challenges
Working With Homeless
Podcast Plugs and Appreciation for Jess

Podcasts we love