The Choice Effect

Artistry Reborn: Rebecca Heidt's Triumph Over Trials

September 12, 2023 Sonny Von Cleveland Season 1 Episode 8
The Choice Effect
Artistry Reborn: Rebecca Heidt's Triumph Over Trials
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Ever feel like your passions and profession are at crossroads? Ever battled with self-doubt and unworthiness? If you nodded yes, this conversation is for you. Join us for a heart-to-heart with award-winning author Rebecca Haidt - a woman who made the brave transition from the food industry to the world of Arts. We navigate through her journey, the inspiration behind her acclaimed Acceptance series, and her fight with grief and depression. Hear how she turned her struggles into fuel for her creativity, eventually giving birth to her latest book Acceptance Reborn.

Living with ADHD is not easy. It can cloud judgment and hamper the decision-making process. But what if there's a silver lining to it all? Rebecca opens up about her life with ADHD and how she used it as a tool to harness her creativity. She throws light on the importance of authenticity, especially when living with disabilities, and how it has shaped her decision-making. Additionally, we discuss the benefits of kick-starting projects early and having a future timeline, providing a fresh perspective on managing diverse interests.

Do video games have a place in our lives beyond entertainment? Rebecca thinks so. We delve into the world of gaming, exploring its therapeutic potential and its role as an inspirational tool for creative individuals. But beware - it's a double-edged sword. We discuss the potential consequences of excessive gaming and the significance of moderation. Tune in to hear Rebecca's unique insights on how she leveraged gaming for personal growth and development. This episode is rich with learnings about personal growth, creativity, and the power of acceptance.

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Thank you for joining us on the Choice Effect Podcast. This is Sonny Von Cleveland, reminding you that every challenge is an opportunity for transformation. Your past doesn't define you; your choices do. Let's keep inspiring, healing, and choosing paths that lead to our best selves. Until next time, stay empowered and remember: You have the power to change your story.

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Sonny Von Cleveland:

And today's guest is someone who has been down many paths but always found her way back to her true passion the Arts. Meet Rebecca Haidt, an award-winning author, speaker and multifaceted talent with experience in management, finance, writing, painting, anthropology and nature. Rebecca has graced multiple podcast platforms, like Survivor to Thriver and Motivational Monday, to share her wisdom on motivation, mental health and the writing process. Today she's here to dive into the life-altering choice that set her on this multifaceted journey. So grab your notebooks and prepare for some genuine inspiration as we discuss the intersection of career, passion and personal growth. Rebecca, welcome to the Choice of Thing.

Rebecca Heidt:

Thank you so much for having me. That was a beautiful intro. I absolutely loved it.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

If you listen to the other episodes, they say that every time. Now and I'm just being nice and trying to talk to people like this is not a special power. Maybe more podcasters should take some time to introduce their people.

Rebecca Heidt:

Yeah, I mean true story. So, like your intro, I listened to some motivational podcast, actually podcast like with them just saying pet talks and they always have that theater music in the background and it's just like otherworldly and I'm like yes.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

It does set a mood right the audience does.

Rebecca Heidt:

Yeah, it does set a mood.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

Yeah, so welcome to the Choice of Thing. Your journey is absolutely fascinating. Can you start by telling us how you transitioned from the food industry into bracing passion in the arts?

Rebecca Heidt:

Sure. So I used to be a restaurant general manager and area coach for a major restaurant chain, and that was my life. I pretty much did hard labor. I was like, oh, okay, so this is the way you put the work in, you get the rewards. And art history was always my passion growing up always. So I actually thought about being an anthropologist when I was younger, when I was in college, but I decided not to because I didn't have the initiation to figure out my path correctly. So I just abandoned all my paths and just went to something I was comfortable with, which was food and putting in my best effort with that, and I was very successful. But at some point I just sort of reached this point in my life where I realized that I needed a little bit more, like something was missing. And so then I was like, okay, well, let's refine who I am, and that was art history, nature.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

And then you got into writing.

Rebecca Heidt:

And then I got into writing.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

And your work in writing has received multiple awards. What inspired the acceptance series and what can we expect from the upcoming third book, Acceptance Reborn? Now, that's not out yet, right?

Rebecca Heidt:

That's not out yet. It's going to be out near the beginning of 2024. And I reread it and I'm like man. This is so good, like I'm just so hyped up on my own book. I love it.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

And so what? Inspired? The acceptance series.

Rebecca Heidt:

So when I was younger anyway between 16 and 20, I always sort of wrote, I wrote and I have this, this, just this imagination. I don't really know where it came from, but I just had this thing where I could see beyond what I was seeing and express it for writing better than my words and my brain could ever do, like it's a thing. And I stopped doing it and I had quite a few. There's another book I started when I was 19 and I had two chapters and I just stopped and I just put everything on hold and I wasn't back in college and I just put everything on hold. So the thing that really prompted it to come forward was me, that whole let's refine me. So I went back to my younger self and notes. I found the old notebooks and I saw what I wrote and I said something like, in some of these things that I wrote, there's something here.

Rebecca Heidt:

So over the years I I kept writing, but the real thing that got me to accept in series is when COVID first hit and it was like this whole shifts in reality happened for everybody because of quarantine and everything happened and I ended up losing four people in my family in March of 2020. Wow, yes, yeah it was. It was difficult. I didn't really know how to deal with it very well, and I didn't have like I had therapy but I didn't like it also wasn't. It was helping but not helping, and so I just started drowning more and I so my outlets are art, walking around and hiking and then, obviously, writing, so I had, since I couldn't do all of those with quarantine, there's limited I went in my mind and I I listened to some some music that really was like inspirational and something you would find in an action scene in a movie, and I was like what could this be?

Rebecca Heidt:

So the spark came from grief, depression, finding motivational music, instrumental motivation music, and then not being afraid to really dive in there because the books are very real. Like I talk about feelings, I talk about betrayal, I talk about love, I talk about being afraid of love. But you know, when we always, when we meet that first person we love, like we are excited about it but we're also afraid of who we are when we admit that we love this person, we probably shouldn't, and there's like that fear and overwhelmingness. And so the acceptance is accepting your emotions how they are, what they represent in your life and then what you could be beyond those emotions.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

It sounds fascinating. I think there's something profound when you in these are fictional stories, but they're based off of real life things. And I think there's something really profound when you analyze your emotions and you learn to overcome them. And you had to overcome some several feelings when this started happen. So, like, what immediate challenges did you face after deciding to delve into these varied interests like art and writing and anthropology? How did you overcome self-doubt in feelings of unworthiness, because it can really stifle you in displaying art?

Rebecca Heidt:

Yes, this is true. This is very, very true. When I started doing my art, I wasn't really like leading into it because I was so unsure about my skill and what I wanted to do. Some direction helped. So, for example, I like acrylic primarily and I also like spray painting, adding them together, and I lacked the confidence. So I didn't think the paintings were great, but the people around me were saying you know, like good job for starting. At least you started to keep working on it, and so I found ways to get better, like I would watch videos or techniques that I couldn't get from people around me. The biggest thing about especially the writing because it's some raw, some raw emotions in there.

Rebecca Heidt:

Sure is that the feeling of me Loving who I am as I go through those emotions and who I am after has to be bigger than the disappointment of people potentially around me.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

Oh, that's a very profound statement. I like that, yeah, yeah, it has to be. It has to be bigger. Your the reward has to be Bigger than D the fear. Right, like you have to to have that, that end goal in mind. Like, okay, the accomplishment is way more than the fear that I'm experiencing. It's gonna hold me back, and I think that that's such a powerful mindset to take into any endeavor, especially when it comes to self expression. Most of us struggle with the opinions of others. How did you learn to live authentically in disregard the naysayers?

Rebecca Heidt:

it took a while. I had a do a lot of self-peptops and be like, okay, well, so the point I've come to a conclusion that the point of having people around us to support us is literally to support. They want us to be successful and support what we could potentially become. If people around me Want me to remain the same because it benefits them whether it's family, friends or for the work or coworkers they are not in my corner they will say they're in my corner, but they're not in my corner. So I had to let go of a lot of. I had to let some, some people go, just sort of let them drift away, because I was outgrowing them and who I used to be with them. And it really comes down to the fear. Is it because of a fear of disappointment in the people around you or is it fear because you're afraid to be successful in a scene? Most of the time, we're afraid to be seen 100% and and and I think that we also have the fear of success.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

A lot of us want that success but then we're afraid to get it because it comes from the fear of being seen, it comes from the opinions of other people. They, we want this in the future. We know that once that comes, everybody's gonna be looking at us and seeing us and then we're afraid of people's opinions and I think it's such a powerful mental tool to have to be able to overcome the fear of the opinions of other people. It's very huge and what you said is so profound also about People growing with you like your true supporters are going to support who you become, not who. You were right and if you have that support system and they support your metamorphosis into you chasing your goals and your dreams, they'll be there with you regardless. How did the, the, the people around you, react to your decision when you made it? Were they supportive, resistant or surprised, given that your, your ADHD and previous issues with follow through? Because you kind of had a strong reaction. Yes, I did. Yeah, commitment was hard for me. I.

Rebecca Heidt:

And my dad sort of the same way. We have all these great ideas and we start the project that we never sort of finished. But sometimes, as an ADHD person, you need to pause the projects and like start another project so you can collect your thoughts and how you want to do stuff and then go back and it's like amazing, and that's sort of how I wrote my book. A little bit. So, when I think, most of the time whenever I made a decision, the people around me were slightly confused, although when I went, I went, ended up going back and getting my bachelor's degree, and they were like very proud of that because that's the normal the, the, the, the, the, the. And then I was like I'm going to write a book and they were like okay, I was like no, but I'm really writing a book.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

You got a bachelor's degree to write a book. I can see where that comes from.

Rebecca Heidt:

Yeah, my bachelor's degree is in business and I was just like, yeah, now I'm going to go write a book, and then I'm like, all right, whatever.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

With hindsight being 2020,. Is there anything you wish you would have done differently in the journey to get where you're at?

Rebecca Heidt:

I honestly wish I started earlier because I wasted time. But you can't get that time back and time never stops for anyone, no matter what goals or dreams you have. Realizing it at any point in your life, regardless of the stage. Me saying, if I was 25, I wish I knew this and started earlier, isn't going to help me whatsoever. It's you know, honestly. It's the fact that I'm doing it at all and still making the steps every day to make this accomplishment a four book series that originally was going to be like one or two and it's the little things you put into yourself that matter the most.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

Taking those little steps forward every day towards a goal and you're 100% right about time, like you can't get it back, you can't go backwards, and there's no point in dwelling on what you didn't do when you could be focusing on what you can do, and I think that that's. And I have ADHD too. I'm like a super hyper ADHD and I've come to find that if you funnel all of these different things, my mind works beautifully amidst chaos and that's. You know, I get the starting a million projects because I have a million projects that go on. But I think that people that have ADHD I know for myself. I find that I'm more comfortable when I have a million different compartments that my brain has to go to and then come back to something, cause I'll find something in those other projects that inspires me about this project and they all just kind of there's like a symbiotic relationship between all the chaos. Do you find that? That's kind of how that works for you?

Rebecca Heidt:

Yes, that's 100% how that works for me, absolutely, absolutely so. For example, if I'm listening, so there's music that sort of fits, different scenes that you're writing to get you in that place. And then, when you're really in that place and you can picture what you're writing as a movie like that's how I saw it, it was a movie in my head, so that's how I wrote it, and then I start seeing colors and art and designs in my head with it and I'm like now I have to go paint because it's like everything that comes in. I'm like, oh my gosh, I can't do two things at once, all right.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

And if you have these different projects at your disposal, you get that inspiration from something and you can jump and do it Instead of having to. If you get the inspiration to paint, if you didn't start the painting project, then you would have to stop what you're doing and go start the painting project, which then hinders you from anything else, cause now I have to learn how to start a painting project, whereas when we start these little projects off on the side, people are thinking oh, you're spreading yourself so thin. You know you can't focus. You're not gonna be able to give 100% on this if you have all these other projects. But what I think a lot of people don't understand about ADHD people is if I start a thousand projects, I have 999 other things that I get to go to. When my brain gets sidetracked, I can jump to one of those. I don't have to go build it, it's already there, cause I started that project and I'll get inspiration from here and I'll be able to jump over to there.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

I think it's fantastic and it's. Being authentic is so important in owning who we are. Especially for people that have ADHD or any type of learning disability. I think being authentic and owning that disability is so huge. You've mentioned that being authentic is rewarding more rewarding than any promotion. How has that life choice shaped your current state of mind and well-being?

Rebecca Heidt:

So many times and many different. I haven't had a ton of jobs Like I'm pretty, I stay in the job for a decent amount of time. But I noticed because of my skill set and my personality and the ADHD I have the ability to provide something to the jobs in corporate life that isn't normally there, because I see things differently, I understand people differently and I think outside the box and I can solve problems faster in a different way that people don't see. So I don't really want to use the word extort but, like they have, you stay in that position so you can be successful for them in that position and I would want to do I get. I love learning as much as humanly possible about a topic. It could be literally about growing grass, but I want to know all of the facts about that thing as soon as I know it. Then I start getting bored because now I know it and I need to learn something else.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

So that's how the I can relate to that, right, it's so crazy, I relate to that so hard. You might be the first actual ADHD person I've talked to about this, but I get that right. Like you start to learn something and it's like, oh, it's exciting, I'm learning something new, and then you delve into it thoroughly and then all of a sudden it's like you know Camboard.

Rebecca Heidt:

Yeah, like I know this now I need to learn something else?

Sonny Von Cleveland:

Yeah, but then we have, we're like we're the masters of knowing so many things but we don't know everything about all of them. But I know a little bit about everything.

Rebecca Heidt:

Enough to get you by Right.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

And so this how has this process really shaped your decision-making Like? Can you share your approach to decision-making and how does this choice influence the process for making future decisions?

Rebecca Heidt:

Yeah. So what I do is I try to picture if I was given an opportunity. I try to picture what, what's not doing it and what successfully doing it would look like in the future. And I sort of have mentally a timeline, so I will do certain projects that need a longer wait time, so my future self will have something to do. And then so I'll also like for my books.

Rebecca Heidt:

For example, I already have the cover for book three done. It's already done. I just have to do the ebook when it's done. And I did that because I know that when I'm done writing it has to go to the editor for the final edit and a beta reader and I'm going to get bored and so then I'm going to be messing with the, the, the dynamics of the rest of the paperback and what I want to put on my bio and the picture and stuff like that. So I already know I won't be having anxiety or panic attack about what is the cover going to look like.

Rebecca Heidt:

I have that. So now I can concentrate on the more and the more of the details. So I set up if something is making me really anxious, I put it down for a second and I take a breather. I'll concentrate on something else, whether that's brainstorming a storyline for book four, whether that's making new characters and giving them back stories, which I have done before. I like almost threw the thing across the room and I was like you know what? Now let's do some research. I like when ADHD people do research, it's like a thousand degree.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

It's a little rough. I will have 15 different windows opened and looking at 75 different things about the same topic and like and I don't know about for you, but for me it's led to discovering new things when I'm researching something, I will jump into researching a topic and then somewhere halfway through that, when I'm in a midst of chaos of with 90 other things on that topic, I find something else that's completely off topic but it sparked my interest and then I'm off into that and next thing, you know, I got 15 other windows opened up on that topic and I forgot why I was originally there. It can be a bit of a process, and so what kind of advice would you offer for somebody that's in a similar crossroads in life, like, especially when they face a lack of support from people around them?

Rebecca Heidt:

That's so relatable.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

You know what I'm talking about.

Rebecca Heidt:

Yeah, I know what you're talking about. That is so relatable. Oh my gosh, that happens to me more times than I would enjoy. But it has also helped me find bookstores and bookstores I can contact and, like I mean, when I don't sleep, I research what to do with my writing and, yeah, it's a whole thing. So, if people, especially ADHD or anyone who's who's an artist in any kind of field, you do not have the support, I would suggest finding different groups that are around, like I found you from you know, I found you and I found other podcasts, individuals you guys are so supportive, so supportive. So the ones that I lack in my life, I get. I get from you, by extension, and don't be afraid to utilize you know, youtube for ideas. Don't let it stop your dreams. My suggestions don't let it stop your dreams because, just because other people don't visualize your dreams, that means they don't have the mentality to be what you need to be or you want to be Like it's you. You are driving your goals. It's not that.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

Right, and the people that may support you, and it's something that I think I've come to to learn about. External support is it's nice to have, but it's not necessary, right, because you'll find support where you look for it, wherever you go. Like you said, if you put yourself out there, gets yourself involved in groups with like minded people. Nowadays, with with technology and social media, there's a group somewhere that is into something that you are into, right? I mean, you could find a group on people that like to lick tree bark and there's a group for that. Right, there's a group of people that will go through and then you'll find that it's. Also there's a passion for people that will tell you the different flavor tones of different bark and how you can. Well, there's a process for actually stripping the bark off so as to not taint the natural odors in in notes that are inside the bark. You know, and I don't know if that's a thing, so don't go up looking like.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

I'm legit, but there's a thing right, so there's there's something for everybody, and if you don't have that support system around you, you can go find it and then, if all else fails, create it. Right, if you build it, they will come, shout out to field of dreams. Right, yeah, they've just build it and they will come. Are there any particular books or resources or people that have influenced your journey?

Rebecca Heidt:

Um, so I mean books. I always love fantasy books growing up, always, always, always, always.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

Fantasy book go.

Rebecca Heidt:

It's hard to. I like fall. I like the fallen series and the tiger curse series. Personally.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

So you're more into the sci-fi fantasy.

Rebecca Heidt:

Yeah.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

Okay, because it has like a token guy, I'm more into the medieval fantasy. Well, that's, that's my thing, but continue people.

Rebecca Heidt:

Yeah, so I mean, um, a lot of it came from. So I'm also a buffy. I grew up on buffy and grew up on Zina. I grew up on fantasy because that's where we, that's, you know, that's what we have available when life isn't exactly how you want it, and that all of that stuff that you know pop culture plays a factor in it. But I mean my dad my dad also was he was very anytime I had an idea he would sit me in front of the computer and be like, let's research it and find out if this is a good idea.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

Good.

Rebecca Heidt:

And then you can make your decision. And I was like oh, you didn't judge me at all, I was great, thank you.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

I like it. I mean, if it wasn't for Zina, we wouldn't know about Kevin Sorbo and Hercules. I know, but you would, but Kevin Sorbo. I know I never bought Kevin Sorbo as Hercules, I'm just going to say it.

Rebecca Heidt:

Really.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

It, just it. Just. He didn't fit the mold of Hercules for me. Like when I think Hercules, I think Arnold Schwarzenegger Hercules or I think you know put the rocket in his Hercules or something like. Like, kevin Sorbo seemed to me like a construction worker and I'm like I just didn't see you as Hercules. While I enjoyed the show I was much more of a fan of Zina, but I did enjoy and I like it. When they cross, they did the cross promotional stuff.

Rebecca Heidt:

It was great I like ate that right up.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

It was. It was really good, but I think I think those were wonderful examples and probably really helped develop where your creative side took, took a launch from. Yeah.

Rebecca Heidt:

Yes, for sure, I mean it's. I think that I mean those kind of shows definitely provide a different I mean any show really can provide a different, different strength. I, I personally, do not really like horror because it scares me, but also because it it lacks, because everyone dies like you Like. How are you gonna learn how to be strong, mentality wise or emotionally wise when everyone's dying? You know, like you have to be able to relate to the hero of the movie, right, because everybody's going to die except that one and maybe one other person, right, like I grew up on the horror and I absolutely loved so, jason.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

Voorhees was my favorite horror character growing up but it was also big, but I used to just love horror. But as I got older, I see what you're saying, right, like it's, it's, I think it's horror movies and and I think it's like horror movies and horror movies in a way that you can see the horror. But as I got older, I see what you're saying, right, like it's it's, I think it's horror movies and books in particular, it kind of cultivate a sense of fear in us and and I think that that can be really subjugating when it comes to self expression, because you, you develop fear and you, you, it's not necessarily fear of something that doesn't exist, but it's it's just the element of fear that lives in, you know, and I think, I think that can be detrimental to somebody's, you know, overall development yeah winning five awards was I know right it outcome.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

How did that feel and did it validate the decision further? Do you think?

Rebecca Heidt:

Honestly, half I've, I've, I've applied for quite a I mean not a ton of awards, because you have to like play in that application thing and stuff. So like I did it and I was like, yeah, I think my book is good enough for the awards and I was like I'm going to try, and then I want some. And I was like, huh, well, that happened. And then I didn't know what to do, I didn't know what to do with a branch, and then I said, well, what?

Sonny Von Cleveland:

do? I do now.

Rebecca Heidt:

Congratulations. Contemporary and and women's fiction fantasy and I was like I actually want something and I was like okay, so maybe the better than I thought, like people actually like it. And then I from my second book I did the same and then like some I didn't get, and then some I did, and then I got free and I was like this is going so well.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

Well, look at that. Well, maybe there's going to be something more from this. I like, and so did that validate that like? Did you have a moment where you were like I knew it, I knew it, I told y'all. Nobody believed it, nobody supported. But look, I told you, is there ever that moment where it was like really validating?

Rebecca Heidt:

Much like I. I literally you know, like when something really good happens and you just sort of stand there their hands out and you're holding it and you're like all right. And then I was like you know what, yeah, this is totally worth all that editing and all that, all the flat you know planning and stuff like that. And and it made me realize a, some awards will see your potential, some will not, so with readers, some will see your book, some will not, so that validated that there's something here. Regardless of the naysayers, I believe in it enough that it won awards and I gave it the time and space it needed to be as good as it was.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

And someone was like, yes, we agree with you, which I super appreciate, yeah yeah, well, you pointed out that you always used to be working, like even during vacations, and you always were working. What was the tipping point that that made you decide that enough was enough, and I'm going to focus on doing these things to that I want to do.

Rebecca Heidt:

So the tipping point for me was, honestly, work for an app because I'm a high achiever yeah, and I'm a high achiever for me because of my standards on myself are so high. Honestly, I want to do so well for myself and then it burns me out because I don't know how to counterbalance it. And when I was in the restaurant industry, I was working 1418 hours depending on what was going on. I was using all my training techniques to build a team that may or may not be there in a couple of months and I realized I was pouring all my effort into something that wasn't resulting directly to me. So I know I.

Rebecca Heidt:

So this epiphany came when I was actually playing a game. I'm a video gamer. And then I was playing into. I was playing Dragon Age Inquisition. Love that game three times. Absolutely good. And I was. You know, when you're the main character of a game like that, everyone around you loves you. You make choices. You know that affect the storyline later and you know they're cheering you on and saying you're great. And then I turned off the game. And then you know it made me happy. And then I turned off the game. It wasn't there anymore, it wasn't in real life I was like well, that means the game.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

All right. Well that there's something really deep there. I think we there's a big culture of people that think that video games are so detrimental to the overall mental health of people. There's also a counterculture that say that video games are therapeutic and mentally helpful to a lot of people. Before I say on what side of that that I fall on, what's your stance on that? Where do you think video games can play either a detriment or an upliftment in people?

Rebecca Heidt:

I think it can be a therapy, but without the proper understanding that if you do it all, anything all the time, it's an incident addiction and it can take over your life. So all the things you're trying to accomplish it can be overtaken by you just falling back on the crutch that is video gaming. But in accommodation it can absolutely help. I used it as therapy to de-wind because I wasn't sure how else to do it. But I was also very good like fable. You know all the fable games, all the Assassin's Creed games, and I would make it my life and we would have gaming nights and it would be like three in the morning, four in the morning, I'd have to work at ten and it would take over my life. So I think moderation, yes, games or anything anything can be therapeutic.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

Yeah, and I think moderation needs to be in all facets of life. I find that I am a gamer I haven't gamed in a long time. My wife and I are on opposite sides of the fence here. My wife thinks that video games are contributing to the downfall of the global culture, and I find that there are therapeutic things that you can take away from gaming, and I find that there's inspiration in gaming as well.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

If you cultivate an artistic mindset or a creative mindset where, like you, you write fantasy books, if you engage in a healthy, moderate gaming hobby, you can get inspiration from some of the things that you see. And it even goes back to like Dungeons and Dragons. Right, I'm a big fan of D&D. I think it's an amazing game, and there have been authors like Margaret Weiss and Terry Hickman and Ari Salvatore who have created not only profitable careers for themselves but also amazing works of literature that have inspired so many people based off of that game. So I believe that gaming in and of itself is not detrimental.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

I think it can be If you overboard, like you said, if you allow it to become an addiction. Sure, it definitely can be, but I also think that there's a healthy aspect to it as well, and when my wife listens to this, she's going to be like uh-uh, nope, nope, don't agree, don't agree, and it's OK. So, in closing, finally, is there any parting wisdom or insights that you would like to share about what it truly means to make a life-altering choice? Because you made this life-altering choice and this is the choice effect and the effects of the choice that you made, to put yourself out there and do that. Is there any parting wisdom or insights that you would want to share with our listeners?

Rebecca Heidt:

The key thing is believing in yourself. So at the bottom of every choice is making a better choice for your future self, regardless of what that means for people around you, because it's in your best interest. Sometimes that means leaving a bunch of people behind. Sometimes that means that it's heartbreaking. It can be very heartbreaking, but if you do not show up for yourself, no one else is going to show up for you the way you can. I think you'd be doing yourself an injustice if you didn't believe in yourself that much.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

Very well said. Couldn't agree more. Go ahead and tell everybody where they can find you and how they can see some of your work and read some of your books and plug away my lady.

Rebecca Heidt:

So my books can be found on Amazon, barnes, noble, also Walmart website, target website, ebay. There's quite a few different places, smaller bookstores as well. Sometimes I travel around and do author signing, so keep an eye out for that. Maybe I'm always the loudest person in the store at the front and I'm just like everyone come poke me, so keep an eye out for that. My TikTok handle is the exalted peacock. Here's my TikTok handle. And then my Instagram handle is called height, h-e-i-d-t. Underscore wristo, underscore revolution, because I'm artistic like that.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

And we will post all these links in the description of the podcast as well, so you guys can find that there. Rebecca, what an honor and pleasure it's been to have you here, and I love your journey, I love your authenticity. I love the way that you own who you are and put that out for the world. I think it's something that people need and I am thoroughly, thoroughly thankful that you came and spent this time with me today.

Rebecca Heidt:

Absolutely. I'm just a lovely person. I'm so glad I could spend this afternoon with you.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

Well, thank you so much and we'll stay up and see where this goes for you and I wish you nothing but the best in the future and I know that you'll have it because you choose to. We'll talk soon. Thank you so much for coming.

Rebecca Heidt:

Thanks.

Rebecca Haidt's Journey and Artistic Inspiration
ADHD's Impact on Decision-Making and Creativity
Validation and Impact of Life-Altering Choices
Appreciation and Well-Wishes to Rebecca

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