The Choice Effect

Unleashing Potential: Tiffany Turner's Mission in Athletes' Mental Health

August 30, 2023 Sonny Von Cleveland Season 1 Episode 5
The Choice Effect
Unleashing Potential: Tiffany Turner's Mission in Athletes' Mental Health
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Can't means won't. This powerful mantra has been a guiding force for our phenomenal guest, Tiffany Turner. Sharing her captivating journey from a camp counselor to becoming a mental health professional, she uncovers the often overlooked and stigmatized world of mental health among elite athletes. Tiffany's life-altering encounter with a young boy, who had witnessed his best friend's removal by a social worker, sparked her dedication to dispel myths around mental health and social work. 

Throughout the conversation, Tiffany delves into the importance of choices we make in our daily lives and how they shape us. With her belief firmly rooted in the mantra "can't means won't," she reiterates not letting fear limit our potential. Tiffany emphasizes the power of perseverance and consistency, reassuring that everyone can reach their desired destination with time. She further explores the reality of our power to choose, often reminding us of the significance of building our own support systems, a resonating theme throughout the episode. 

The COVID-19 pandemic has undoubtedly turned our lives upside down, and Tiffany Turner uses this drastic change as an opportunity to highlight the emergence of a life outside the traditional corporate model. Recommending books such as Bernay Brown's "The Gifts of Imperfect Parenting" and "Atomic Habits" by Tom Ivekovic, she guides those on a path of personal growth. Through her compelling narrative, Tiffany proves to be an incredible resource for understanding the power of small, consistent changes, and recognizing our potential to make choices. Tune in to absorb the invaluable advice and the remarkable work of Tiffany Turner in the sphere of mental health.

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Thank you for joining us on the Choice Effect Podcast. This is Sonny Von Cleveland, reminding you that every challenge is an opportunity for transformation. Your past doesn't define you; your choices do. Let's keep inspiring, healing, and choosing paths that lead to our best selves. Until next time, stay empowered and remember: You have the power to change your story.

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Sonny Von Cleveland:

And today we are joined by an incredibly inspiring guest, Tiffany Turner. With over 25 years of experience in mental health, Tiffany has dedicated her life to breaking the stigma surrounding mental health, especially within the realm of elite athletes. In the community, she has encountered diverse experiences, from the corridors of hospitals to the expanse of wilderness therapy. What led her down this path was a simple yet profound interaction with a young boy at a summer camp, an experience that forever shaped her perspective on the world. Today we'll dive into that life altering choice, the waves it created and how it has made Tiffany the compassionate social worker and life coach she is today. Tiffany, how are you?

Tiffany Turner:

I'm great. How are you?

Sonny Von Cleveland:

I am doing really well. Thank you so much for being on, and let's dive right into who you are and how you got to this point in your life.

Tiffany Turner:

Yeah, thanks, thanks for having me on. I think it's such a great thing what you're doing at this podcast, because I think there's always moments that kind of launch our lives in different directions. So, yeah, you want me to just dive into kind of the story and how things started shifting for me.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

Yeah, yeah. Can you take us back to that time at the summer camp as a summer camp counselor? Yeah, and what was the immediate feeling you had after the altering interaction with that little boy? Tell us about the interaction with the little boy and then the feeling that came after that.

Tiffany Turner:

Yeah.

Tiffany Turner:

So we were about halfway through summer and I was already in school for psychology in my undergraduate program and knew I wanted to work with kids and work with people in a way of either therapy or psychiatry, and so I was doing internships trying to figure that piece out, and had this amazing kid in camp for several weeks and he went home between some of the sessions and he was by my side the whole first part of camp and then after going home and coming back he wouldn't come anywhere near me, wouldn't talk to me, almost acted afraid, and I was just really confused because I didn't.

Tiffany Turner:

It didn't occur to my late teen self that there were things going on at home for him, and so as we kind of problem solved what was going on, we realized that he had witnessed his best friend, who lived next door to him, being removed by a social worker who happened to be white and it was an African American family.

Tiffany Turner:

And so as this kind of unfolded, it really brought to my awareness the story and the path that happens outside of our awareness and how that affects our interaction and everything else, and so it really just shifted my perspective as I looked around the camp, but then also since then, as I've interacted with people and has really driven me to understand and accept and have an awareness about everybody else's path as they move through life and we interact with them. We're interacting with a small portion of who they are, and so I think that was pretty profound for a late I think 19, 20 year old at the time when picking a career path. So yeah, so it was. It's kind of shaped and continues to shape. You know, when I look at people and consider where they have been or where they're headed in life or the path that they got there, it's easy to see the success that they're having, but kind of what's behind that?

Sonny Von Cleveland:

Yeah, and then you. What happened with the little boy? You ended up breaking through that barrier, right.

Tiffany Turner:

Yeah. So once we figured out what we had called home and kind of figured out what was going on with his mom, it was a great way to open up conversation both as counselors and kids at the time for us you know we were kids at the time but it also was this bigger piece of having making sure we're having discussions with parents before they send their kids back of any big things that were happening. So we weren't kind of blindsided no, we weren't blindsided. My own connection in space and really how it resolved was giving him a little bit of space to rebuild that trust with me over the next couple of days and then it ended up being fine and things kind of resolved fairly quickly. But that's not unusual for kids that age. I think it stuck with me much longer.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

And then that interaction is what compelled you to get into social working.

Tiffany Turner:

Yeah, so that is why really, like I guess, drove my focus into social work from psychiatry. I'd been worked in a pediatric psychiatric unit prior to that and felt like this working through and understanding and seeing the whole picture was really where I wanted to be.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

So Well, on that note, your decision was based on a limited interaction.

Tiffany Turner:

Yeah.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

With limited information from a single interaction, I should say what made you so sure that this was the path that you wanted to follow, despite not having the full picture?

Tiffany Turner:

Because it just felt like who I was. It just kind of aligned. And it was one of those moments where I started looking at what down the road looked like and what careers looked like and what a career of what I was actually doing that summer and how that aligned with helping people and what came naturally and the seeking information and really understanding the process of what people go through when we don't see them.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

Sure.

Tiffany Turner:

Is what landed me more in the social work path than any other field, because it's not limited, so social workers can do a variety of things once they get. So it wasn't just that you get up and do this every day. I got to constantly choose which area of social work I wanted to work in.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

Which led you to where you are, and there's a lot of misconceptions that come with social work. And, in a world filled with misconceptions, how has your journey helped you to dispel myths, not just about social workers but about mental health in general, especially among like elite athletes?

Tiffany Turner:

Yeah, so I think there's a lot of pieces of mental health that are seen Well, and social workers. I mean, it's as recent as 18 years ago I was working in the hospital studying emergency room and had a patient. I went in to help and give resources and the family hadn't done anything wrong, the kid was just sick. Because that happens when you have kids and they said, oh, please don't take my baby. There's still that idea out there that that's what social workers do and some do work in that system.

Tiffany Turner:

But I think having that experience that I had and the awareness and then the career path, helping people understand that that's not, that's a job role, it's not the primary job role in that, really, social workers are out there fighting, advocating for those who are struggling with something right, whether it's homelessness, whether it is anxiety, depression, life changes, unexpected job loss, covid, right, like there are so many places and there's so many different kinds of social workers, and so I think one of the things that I do really well is making sure people get to the right people. Like there are social workers who specifically work with homeless population or the Like drug abuse and.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

Yeah thank you. And even right, right and even look as far as like abuse in the home, and so I mean there's so many, there's a vast array of social work that gets done.

Tiffany Turner:

Yeah, so.

Tiffany Turner:

I think part of my thing is making sure people get to the right people. So if somebody comes to me and says I'm struggling with this, I may not be the best fit for that. I play college sports and so I have gravitated towards working with athletes because of the stigma, because often it's seen as being weak if you need support and we're starting to see a shift in that but you look at performing at that level plus being a college student, plus being a high school student or whatever level, and then having social media now as an input and everybody's an expert on everything Right.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

Everybody's a life coach, everybody's a speaker, everybody's a motivational force, and I mean, with the way that that is becoming so ubiquitous, I think it puts a little bit more stress on people that actually do the work to try to make a profound impact. And you had a really strong family support and I just wanted to dive in a little bit. Some people don't have that kind of structure with such a strong family support system. How did, how does that influence the way that you support and coach others, and especially those without a similar support system?

Tiffany Turner:

Yeah. So I think it's one of the things that I really look at when first working with somebody, or talking about working with somebody or helping somebody seek out support is what does that support system look like? Because it doesn't always look like family. Mine very much looked like parents and a brother and who had open discussions and were supportive. But not everybody has that. But some people have a friend, some people have a neighbor who kind of creates that support system or at least a safe place to go. Some people have nobody and so I think in order to start working with anyone, you have to understand where that starts from and help them build with where they're at. And I think for people especially. I worked in a detention center. Those kids coming out of the detention center were sometimes coming out at 18 and they were no longer in the same support structure that they were before, plus they had lost several years, so they hadn't made that transition on their own, which is very different than somebody who just doesn't have this structure.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

And speaking from the experience of that it's also they don't mature at the normal rate. No, they're stuck in a crazy world. That's primarily violence which is so ubiquitous there. But then they're released and they may not have the same familial structure that they had before if they did have one, which oftentimes in cases of detention we see that they don't. But I think it's also important that we emphasize how to find that structure within yourself and build that your own support system, and then going out and learning how to have conversations and human interaction to build a support system through friendships and other relationships. I think that that's a very important thing to do. You've mentioned the value of understanding other people's paths and experiences in that Um. Can you share a specific instance where this understanding deeply impacted a coaching or a therapy session, Like where you had that understanding and there was maybe a particular client or something where that experienced helped you to navigate that coaching session?

Tiffany Turner:

Yeah, I mean, I think of so many examples, but you know, I can think of um a time where it was there was, you know, somebody who had done a lot of therapy and a lot of support and was very successful. But what was what was still underlying as they became an adult and started their own family and started their own process was those, that family trauma that they thought they had gotten past or like coped with, kept coming up and it was re triggered and I think it was a very clear to me, a very clear correlation, that they felt that their success had meant that that stuff had been dealt with over time.

Tiffany Turner:

Right, and so helping them understand that yes, they were successful and yes, it was because they had built all these strengths and had done this work. But our path is who we are good, good, better.

Tiffany Turner:

Otherwise it goes with us. And so shifting from not wanting to have that past be the reality to embracing it and shifting it into this is, this, is what made me me, and it's not all good and it's not all bad. But it's all part of the experience, yeah, and without those experiences, good and bad, I wouldn't be the person that I am 100%.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

That's something that I teach about a lot is that you know, we don't run from the past. We don't. We don't hide it, we don't run from it, we don't try to push it down, we accept it, we embrace it and because it's made us who we are and everybody's fallible, everybody makes mistakes and you got to itself. Forgiveness is a huge part of that and you've dealt with a lot of athletes and just in that realm you know, you, what challenges have you faced in ensuring that elite athletes often they're often seen as invincible you can be the athlete they can develop that thing. Yeah, what challenges have you faced in helping them to understand the importance of mental health, because it's very important?

Tiffany Turner:

Yeah. So I think that there's some unlearning that has to be done first, right, so I've worked with some athletes who who come in and they're like, ok, well, I just need help with this one event that I'm really anxious about, and then I'm good, and then it's unlearning that it's not just about that one competition, one event. There are some things that really go into it. And again, helping them understand I mean, most athletes who rise to college professional Olympic level, it's not just them who has sacrificed they're. They're out there competing to support all of the sacrifice that everybody friends, time with friends, maybe you know academics, maybe even a prom for which, for as an adult, it's like, ok, well, that's really not going to alter your life, but for a 16, 17 year old kid who's giving up all of that to train, that's a big deal, right.

Tiffany Turner:

And so like they see it as a price to pay to participate at that level. But I don't know that. Well, ok, oftentimes what I hear is that it's the price to pay and then, when we really start talking about it, there's a lot of those price tags, whether it's time away from family holidays or something like that. Family holidays, training, injuries, fear of all kinds of things, anxiety, trauma, you know, and it's different trauma than what we think about but, like having a career, any injury when your parents have worked two jobs or have moved across country for you to train.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

Yeah.

Tiffany Turner:

Or when your family is counting on you to get that big paycheck from a big fight or a big contract, like it's not just an injury at that point.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

There's a lot of mental stress that comes in with that, and if it's not handled properly, I think that we see a lot of athletes that even hit the elite level, that are that are not OK mentally Right, and and I think it's it's because it's it's because of exactly what you had just spoken about, and and those things tend to to fester and they're trained to to be able to push through pain.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

Yeah, because on the other side of pain is greatness, and so I think there's a correlation between mental stress and in innocent depression and these repressed emotions, and they correlate that with pain. So then they just push through it to try to come out, on the other side, greater. But the problem is not, there's a difference between emotional pain and physical pain. The physical pain does heal. Emotional pain has to be processed in order to heal, and and I think that that can get lost. So I think what you're doing is is phenomenal and your perspective on decision-making is fascinating. Let me just say that Can you elaborate on the idea of an abundance mindset and and how Surrounding yourself with certain people can shift one's decision-making paradigm?

Tiffany Turner:

Yeah, yeah. So you know, I think it comes from being originally stemmed from being an athlete and then going back to that kind of first experience with that camper is understanding there's a process and looking at it's easy To look at somebody like you who's, who's published a book and is doing a podcast and and is doing speaking and coaching and Making change in the community and and for people to say, wow, that success, that like I want to be where he's at, but not always seeing the struggle, the Barriers and I call them barriers instead of failures, because they can create you, you know, prevent you from getting where you need to be but you also have a choice to kind of think differently and move around it.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

So the best sentence ever you also have a choice to move around it right, because these, the barriers or obstacles, are just opportunities, and if we can teach people that you have a choice, it's not about the, the circumstance, it's about the response to that circumstance that's going to define whether it's a failure or a success.

Tiffany Turner:

Absolutely. I always tell people you know we have a thousand choices a day. You can get up and go to work, make it if you want, and the high schoolers that I work with always are appalled. But I'm like you can go to school naked, like, and they're like well, I can't their rules against that. I'm like there are rules against everything but it's a choice.

Tiffany Turner:

You know the consequences. You're choosing not to have those consequences, but it's still a choice for you to get up, not go to school naked. It's not because the school set of rules people break rules all the time, but yeah, so, so kind of looking at that aspect of things and then and then, and then connecting with people who are Intimidated, don't feel that scarcity mindset, and look at you and say, okay, so this is what you want to do, how can I help? And that's kind of the first question, which then, in turn, leads you to asking the same thing right, how can I help you? How can I support you? How can I do things that are in my realm, in my expertise, to make a difference there? Because it is Really comes down to you. I can look at people who are successful or have tons of money and and Compare myself and be angry and upset and and put that person down, but it still doesn't change my situation.

Tiffany Turner:

So, if I look at that person and say, wow, they got here. There has to be a path. Their path might be different. They might not have a support system, like I did with family. They might not have kids. That I do where I I'm making a choice to put them first, before my career sometimes, but that those are all my choices and it creates my path. But if they got there, I can get there too. It means it's possible by somebody else succeeding. Just because you have a different path doesn't mean that you know it's preventative. You know it's preventative right.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

Seeing the possibility Exists, let you know that you can do it as well.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

And I, you know, I think, on the topic of Kant, when I was a kid, I, I think one of the most Profound things that stuck with me through most of my life, even though I I went through a lot of abuse and had a lot of problems in my life Can't means won't, and I remember, I remember I don't even remember where I saw it, but I remember can't means won't and it stuck with me my whole life. And so, while I've had to go through a lot of Trauma in and downside, things that always stuck with me and there's nothing I can't do just means I won't. You, you can say I can't go to school naked. No, you won't go to school naked because there are rules that we have to follow. But we don't have to do anything. You, there's nothing you can't do. There's some things you won't do, nothing you can't do. Change in choices go hand in hand. For someone that's on the brink of a significant choice, but paralyzed by fear, what steps would you recommend that they take to move forward?

Tiffany Turner:

So I think one is looking at what you want, right, what's your goal, what are your expectations, and then looking at the reality of what are the barriers, what are the things in the way, what am I gonna have to overcome, navigate, discuss? And I think it's one of those things where you know you can be paralyzed by fear, but fear also keeps us safe, right, and that is one of the things that the amygdala does is creates all this anxiety, but it's also what keeps us from doing really dangerous things from the moment we're born. And so, once you know, if I'm talking to somebody and they're like you know, I just I can't do this. A lot of what I do is start talking about why they wanted to and what was the passion behind it and what was the reason behind it. Because they started down that path for some reason, something sparked them and that can create this calming effect where we start talking about dopamine and serotonin going to your brain and supporting you and feeling more calm, more safe, more supported, and then talking about the strengths. What have they done, right? What?

Tiffany Turner:

I was speaking at a coalition for homeless people in Michigan and they were saying, well, what if that person is just surviving moment to moment and they can't get motivated for treatment or they can't get motivated to go get food. And I said that person has been surviving up to this point, so whether it was the last hour that they were surviving through like they have done so much and that is a huge strength is realizing that you're still showing up, you're still here and you're still thinking about what that looks like. It might take you a week to take those steps, but you're here and you keep showing up, day after day and you continue, as long as you can continue, to see where you want to go. You're motivated, your brain's motivated. You just got to get out of the fear that something could go wrong, because the reality is something could go wrong at any point during the day, At any moment.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

And I think that's a place where the camp means won't Philosophy could be more effective because they can't get help, or they can't. It means you won't, you won't get help. If you're living homeless, you're choosing to stay there because there are so many resources available. And this is something that I mean I've constantly debated with people on, because they're always like well, some people can't, no, no, no, no. Some people won't. Right, Because can't, it's not a thing, right?

Sonny Von Cleveland:

If you are homeless and you want to change, move, go somewhere else. Well, they don't have the money to walk. You can walk your two legs, work, you can start in that direction and you will find a way. You will figure out how to get to your destination. You can go anywhere you want to. It's a free country. You're allowed to move wherever you want. And if you're homeless in Michigan which I don't recommend, especially most of the time move somewhere else, go somewhere else and there's opportunity somewhere else. You will not find an opportunity to advance your life if you stay in the same place. That's not being conducive to a change, and it's that simple.

Tiffany Turner:

I think you just hit the nail in the head as far as that. You know, in your career, in your life, in your emotional and mental health journey.

Tiffany Turner:

You're not going to make progress staying where you're at and it can be comfortable there, right, if I'm not triggered, I'm not struggling with anxiety. It's not paralyzing me, it's not preventing me from going to work, it's not preventing me from performing at a level in which I'm playing professional sports in all rights. I'm successful. It's not ideal, I'm not happy all the time, but I'm successful, right, and I think that's where it comes back to. Okay, that's comfort, and sometimes we have to push ourselves outside of that comfort zone in order to hit an area where it looks like success. For me, that was going from, you know, working in medicine, in the hospital field and with medical providers, to starting my own practice. Like that allowed me a lot of freedom, but it was really scary and I think that Of course it's scary, and I don't want that to be confused with.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

A lot of homelessness is surrounded by mental health issues, and so when I say you can go anywhere, do anything, I'm excluding the people that have a physical disability that prevent them from it, or a clinical, medical, mental disability that prevent them from doing it. So there's, you know, like I constantly I've just recently have been seeing the state of disrepair in Kensington Philadelphia and it's you know, I see a lot of these videos on Kensington Philadelphia and it's a third world country, right, I mean, it's just, it's in such a bad situation but the and everybody says, well, I don't know how to fix it, I don't know if it can be fixed, or if it can be fixed, it can be fixed. It's the people that are there that have to make the decision they want. They have to want something different and I think, primarily when people hit those streets and they try to effectuate change, they're almost enabling the behavior by providing everything that these people need to stay there.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

They're providing blankets and they're providing clothing and they're providing food and they're providing shelters and tents, and when you give somebody a tent that's homeless and hooked on drugs, he's gonna put the tent up and stay there hooked on drugs. Right, he's not gonna, they're not gonna leave. And so I think, while it's important to care and show compassion for people that are in that situation, we also have to empower them. We have to let them know that there's a choice here, and you're making the choice to stay. Transitioning over over the years, what has been the most surprising or unexpected outcome from a decision made by one of the individuals that you've coached?

Tiffany Turner:

I think career, you know, career shift is probably one of the biggest things when coaching people about, you know they come to me because they're usually some of the best of the best right.

Tiffany Turner:

And so when that person realizes that they have the skills, we work through the staff and that it really wasn't that they were struggling with anxiety or depression.

Tiffany Turner:

That was only a piece of it but really they weren't fulfilled in another way. Whether that's going back to school because they never finished their degree because sports carried them and didn't allow for that path, or whether it's hitting the peak of their career Super Bowl, olympic gold medal, whatever that looks like and then realizing that they had never looked past that, to what was next, because that was the only path that they were on, and then how to adapt and adjust and figure out that once that accomplishment had been made, you know the choice in sports is to continue pushing for another success at that level, retire or figure out something else, and that is a really difficult decision, whether or not you have mental health history or have struggled. I mean I find it hard to believe that anyone has an experienced anxiety or depression at some point in their life, if they're completely honest. But you know, I think those are the periods of time where I see the biggest reaction of like, oh, this is just normal.

Tiffany Turner:

This is normal. I you know. Nobody told me I could think past this goal or that there might be out there something else.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

And that's the thing, right Like there's. Nobody has a guidebook. We don't come to life with a guidebook. What we come with is our instinct, first and foremost, and then our external influences. Right Like it starts with parents, obviously, or whoever your caretakers are, when you grow up Some people grow up without parents, but those external influences so severely impact the outlook that we have as children.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

And then, growing up, you need some type of external source that's going to come in and say, hey, you don't have to do this, but you can do this. There are these options, and I think, when people are given those options, I think that's and I think that we're seeing a lot of that shift happen now in our culture that people are understanding that they don't have to do anything. And I think, if I could pinpoint a positive from COVID, I think that was one of the positives that came out of COVID, because you see so much more entrepreneurs now and self-employed people and people that are working remotely and from home, and while there's a segment of culture that is angry about that, those are primarily corporate business owners or people that own massive businesses that rely on the hard work of other people, and people are not realizing, like I can do whatever I want to do and monetize that and live a full, happy life doing what I want to do.

Tiffany Turner:

I think it was really eye-opening that for people that there was other ways than the way it had always been done right, the way that they saw their parents do things, the way that they saw success. And then I think there were people who just said, like what am I? What am I doing this for? Like I'm missing all of this stuff and like now I can't see those people I care about, I can't travel, which I love, I can't go do the things that I love and because of COVID I can't do all of this stuff and restrictions. And when it's done, I'm not going to live my life for somebody else's success, I'm going to figure out how to succeed and have this balance.

Tiffany Turner:

I do agree, I think, the other thing which you know not I'm not bringing this up because it's political, but the Michelle Obama in her book. It was really interesting. She's really one of the first people at that level that I've heard talk about. Why do we ask kids to be one thing when they grow up right? Like from kindergarten. You have like, when I grow up I want to be, and she's like there's few of us who have been, just one thing.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

Right, there are so many. I love Michelle Obama.

Tiffany Turner:

Yeah.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

One of you know heard I live by one of her things when they go low, we go high, right, and I think it's. She's such a phenomenal human being, both her and Barack. I think what Barack has done after his presidency is it shows who he is as a human being, right, just an amazing, incredible guy. I highly recommend his documentary series on whatever Netflix or wherever it's at, but the national parks thing just incredible, it's just captivating. Finally, for our listeners that are constantly seeking to grow, are there any books or resources that have been instrumental in shaping your views on choices and change that you could recommend for somebody to delve into?

Tiffany Turner:

Yeah. So I mean I always recommend Bernay Brown, any of her books really and there's one, the gifts of imperfect parenting. If there's family structural and not just if you're a parent but if you grew up in a family structure where you just have a lot of questions about why they did this or that, I think it is a great book to help look at the generational process of shame, guilt, resilience, because you can look at it from two lenses one as a parent in your own kids, but also as a human who had Parents in some form guardian, something was raised by some, even a system right for the kids who are raised in detention centers. So I think her books give a lot of insight about shame, which are, you know, our Generations of kids have been brought up in education systems that shame kids in society, that shame kids religion. So I think her books have a lot to offer about communication and just that process. I also really, really, really believe strongly in I can't think of the author's name, but I'm atomic habits.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

Yeah, yeah, tom, I damn it. Now you put me on the spot. I can't think. Atomic habits? Just look up the book.

Tiffany Turner:

atomic habits, yeah so you know, and I think, at different parts of your life, when you're going through things, you can read it and and gather different things out out of it. And I think that is the piece where, when you look at when you want to go in life, you have to look first at what choices you're making and it's easier to say, well, I can't do this because I don't have the money, or I can't do this because I don't have the connections.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

But there's that word can't.

Tiffany Turner:

I know, I know, but there's really this piece of it of like, what barriers am I Putting up, what? What's going on with me instead of what's going on externally first, and I think you know, depending on where your journey is at, that can be a great thing to just help you keep taking those tiny steps forward and Realizing that it's better than just staying where you're at and paralyzed by fear. So, yeah, so I think those are the big ones. The subtle art of not giving a fuck was also like.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

I love that book. That book was fantastic.

Tiffany Turner:

Looking at comparison ideas and just that tax comparison piece and because I was, I was Felt like I was the only one talking about it for a long time, at least in the professional world. And then I read that book and I'm like see they get it.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

Yeah, they do, they get it. Tiffany Turner, what a fantastic human being. I love the work that you're doing. You're Incredible, and thank you so much for taking the time out to come share with us and and for our listeners, tell them where they can find you and how they can locate you, and and learn more about you.

Tiffany Turner:

Yeah, so Thanks so much for having me on. It's been great. I look forward to watching your podcast grow and listen all your guests and reading your book when it's out.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

It's available now it is. Yeah, I, it's a crazy story and I'll tell you about it.

Tiffany Turner:

I know you got the first copy, but anyway. So yeah, you can follow me on Instagram at tithy Baldwin. You can Check out my website at t-turner coachingcom or, oh sorry, t-turnersolutionscom.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

And I'll post all those links in the description as well.

Tiffany Turner:

That'd be great.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

All right, well, thank you so much, tiffany. It was great talking to you and I will stay in touch and we'll see where we go in the future. I look forward to it.

Tiffany Turner:

Sounds good, look forward to it.

Tiffany Turner
Supporting Athletes' Mental Health
Power of Choice, Overcoming Fear
Choices, Change, and Overcoming Barriers
Tiffany Turner's Work and Contacts

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