The Choice Effect

Journey to Self-Discovery: Pamela Holt's Solo Adventures

August 27, 2023 Sonny Von Cleveland Season 1 Episode 2
The Choice Effect
Journey to Self-Discovery: Pamela Holt's Solo Adventures
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Unearth the story of resilience and determination with our guest, Pamela Holt, a bold spirit who embraced life's adversities by venturing into the world of solo travel. On today's episode, we explore Pamela's captivating journey, transitioning from the dazzling Broadway stages to the raw and untouched expanses of Iron Artica. Despite surviving three major car accidents, Pamela emerged with a new perspective on life, making a life-altering decision to travel to 80 countries by the time she hit half a century.

Pamela's anecdotes from her solo travels serve as powerful life lessons and expose transformative experiences. She takes us through her process of choosing transformation over being a victim, highlighting the importance of climbing life's walls and the potential of personal metamorphosis. From a life-changing experience at Trader Joe's to surviving the challenges of solitary travel, Pamela's journey is a testament to the power of resilience.

Accompany us as Pamela divulges how she undertook a journey of self-discovery through solo travel. Learn how she cemented her faith and self-belief, backed by the support of her loved ones and the profound influence of the book 'Feel the Fear and Do It Anyway'. From an enlightening experience in a Balinese rice paddy to her loved ones' reactions to her solo travels, Pamela's journey provides unique insights into the art of solo travel. Tune in as Pamela inspires you to embrace life's challenges and perhaps, embark on your own journey of self-discovery.

Connect with Pamela!
Twitter: https://twitter.com/ThePamelaHolt
FaceBook: https://www.facebook.com/ThePamelaHolt
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thepamelaholt/

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Thank you for joining us on the Choice Effect Podcast. This is Sonny Von Cleveland, reminding you that every challenge is an opportunity for transformation. Your past doesn't define you; your choices do. Let's keep inspiring, healing, and choosing paths that lead to our best selves. Until next time, stay empowered and remember: You have the power to change your story.

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Sonny Von Cleveland:

And welcome back to the Choice Effect podcast, your sanctuary of stories where life altering choices transform ordinary lives into extraordinary lives. I'm Sunnyvon, cleveland, and today I'm thrilled to introduce you to someone whose spirit is indomitable and whose story exemplifies the power of choice and resilience. Her journey ranges from the Broadway stages' bright lights to the untouched expanses of Iron Artica, all traveled solo. Meet Pamela Holt, not just a travel enthusiast but also the executive producer and host of Me, Myself and the World the art of solo travel. Having treaded paths in over 81 countries alone, pamela embodies the essence of redefining one's life through the bravest of choices. Let's dive into her incredible journey. Hi, pamela.

Pamela Holt:

Hi Sunny, Thank you for having me.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

Absolutely, it's my pleasure, it's good to see you, and you are currently located in California as well, right?

Pamela Holt:

I am. I'm in Los Angeles. I like it, my home town, you're all.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

Los Angeles traffic. You've got to love that, right. I've only been here for about two years, two and a half years and I've experienced LA traffic a couple of times, and it's the reason why I will not move to LA.

Pamela Holt:

The one positive thing is you get to listen to a lot of great podcasts like this one.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

I love it, I love that. So let's jump in and just tell us a little bit about yourself and your story and your background, and then I'm going to interrogate you.

Pamela Holt:

OK, well, my passion is travel. As you'd mentioned, currently have a show streaming on Amazon and Go Traveler and a bunch of other platforms called Me, myself and the World the Art of Solo Travel. It's been my motivation, my passion for so long and it's something that I do with joy. I guess I grew up in California until I was about 11, and then I moved to the beautiful island of Hawaii and went to UCLA and started solo traveling at 19 and never looked back.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

That's incredible. From the heart of Broadway to the depths of the Amazon rainforest, you've had quite the transition. Tell us about your life on stage and what it felt like to shift gears after all of those crazy adventures.

Pamela Holt:

Yeah Well, like I said, I started traveling at 19. I was directing some shows in Japan, which was really fun. When I first graduated college, I got really lucky. I booked a movie, I sang a duet with Barry Manilow some really fun, exciting things and then I started my journey on stage. I did Broadway-style shows. I worked for Roe, caribbean and Celebrity and some really wonderful cruise lines, and then I transitioned to being a guest entertainer and headline entertainer and I was seen by a few people and they said, hey, you've got to head yourself back to land and start auditioning for some of the Broadway shows. And I had already booked. Actually, oh my gosh, what was my first show? Oh, that's terrible. I should remember that. Right, it's the one with the teapot Beauty and the Beast.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

There we go, oh nice.

Pamela Holt:

And I was on my way to booking a really solid role, and I was about, maybe three, four blocks away from the final callback of Smokey Jokes Cafe, my first Broadway tour, and unfortunately I got t-boned in a car accident. We're in a car, a woman t-boned me and wrapped my car around a telephone pole and I woke up a month later to a message from the producer asking me why I left a message as to why I hadn't shown up, because the part was mine. And that was the real shift. I had gone from performing for over 10 years having 120 minutes of material in my head, sometimes doing two-hour shows a night, to barely even remembering my best friend's name, and that was really a massive change. So that was my life-altering moment.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

That's insanity. You faced adversity that would have broken many, because it wasn't just that car accident. There were three car accidents and surgeries and life-threatening decisions. How did you transform those trials into a springboard for your ambitions of travel?

Pamela Holt:

Yeah, there really was a moment I think I remember distinctly. It was a Thursday, maybe four or five o'clock in the afternoon and after what you've just said, I actually had three car accidents. The second car accident really wasn't that bad, but the third one was none of them my fault, I might add.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

And just so people get an idea what time span were these three accidents in?

Pamela Holt:

Yeah, the first one was in 2005. And the last one was about probably six. Oh gosh, it was about six, seven years later.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

Right.

Pamela Holt:

So in seven years three car accidents, two major car accidents insanity and a massive amount of pain, a massive amount of anger, resentment. Basically, in those eight years I lost everything I had worked for. I'd lost my career, I had lost all the money I had saved because I was now spending it on just daily leaving and rehabilitation. And then I lost my life path. And in that third car accident, after dealing with the pain like excruciating pain for over a year and going from doctor to doctor to figure out what's wrong, I was just randomly forced to get a secondary CT scan and a friend of mine asked a doctor to look at it and he sent it over to a spine surgeon. And the surgeon called me on a Thursday night and he said hi, get your affairs in order. You'll be here at 5 AM on Monday morning. You're having spine surgery and there's no guarantees.

Pamela Holt:

And in that precise moment I decided, ok, I choose life and I say I chose to live capital L-I-V-E. And it was such a precise moment I just literally decided, after they rattled off all the terrible things that could and would happen, I just decided, nope, mine's going to be great and when I'm done with this, I'm going to get to 80 countries by my 50th birthday. And it was literally just a split decision. I remember the exact place and moment that I made that decision, and then I had a really, really fun weekend preparing no-transcript. I spent the next day literally riding my will and kind of preparing my and my affairs.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

Well, I mean, if I'm gonna do this, but I'm prepared.

Pamela Holt:

Yeah, well-.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

Your 80 by 50 promise is nothing short of awe inspiring. How did these audacious goals come into existence, especially when you were wrestling with some tense health issues?

Pamela Holt:

Yeah, well, starting traveling with my family at age 13, we went to Asia and I had already been to seven countries, so that was a real taste.

Pamela Holt:

And I think I spent my 14th birthday at a really cool restaurant in Hong Kong, and I had saved my money all summer before our trip to buy this really flashy 1980s Seiko watch. And I remember being there on my birthday without watch, thinking I love traveling, I love other cultures, I love getting to know people, and that's where I caught the bug. And so I had acquired a decent amount of countries by the time I got to my 35th birthday, 40th birthday, but I definitely wasn't anywhere near 80. And so, to answer your question, it was just this goal that came to my head and I said all right, I have something to live for. Here was the fun thing. So on the weekend before I had that spine surgery, I went race car driving. I bought this crazy bold lipstick to wear in the middle of surgery, when you're not supposed to wear any makeup at all If I'm going under the knife, I'm gonna look.

Pamela Holt:

Yes, and I booked. I called American Airlines on Sunday night and I said I'd like to book a trip to the Middle East because I wanted to go backpacking, I wanted to see Petra and go to Israel. And I said, but I can't pay for it until I. You know, I have to make sure that I wake up tomorrow morning after this spine surgery. And, a I can walk and B I lived. And the lady's like, oh no, wait a minute. So she left all these notes in my ticketing, in my ticket, and it said, if I call back, press, send and book the ticket. And that was my motivation. I walked into that surgery and I let everyone in the OR know hey, I've got a trip planned on July 9th. This is January. You guys have to make this right because in six months I'm gonna put on a 40 pound backpack and go backpacking in the Middle.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

East. You better get me in the proper shape.

Pamela Holt:

Yes, and I made them a mixed CD, which they thought was hysterical, and they listened to it. I was like here it's some of my favorite music, like literally jokingly, from ACDC to Madada and everything in between. And then I took I mean, I'm so loopy, they've got me so high at this point. On pain, you know different pain medications, sleep medications and I reached over and I used the scalpel to put on this new lipstick that I had hiding in the bed. And they're like what are you doing? I said, well, I just thought I would wear this fabulous new lipstick in case it didn't work out as planned and already be ready for the open casket. They just were howling and they said it was one of their most fun surgeries. And so when I- that's incredible.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

And so that's kind of like the coffee bean analogy, where you know you become the coffee bean and you change your environment. You weren't just gonna go in under the knife, you went in there and you're like I am going to change the atmosphere in here and I'm gonna make this surgery and experience for you as well, because my life is technically in your hands and I have a lot of goals, so I need y'all to be in the happiest mindset possible. It's just incredible. And that leads me into my next thought. People around us often play crucial roles during our toughest times. How did your close circle, your friends, your families, your colleagues? How did they react to your travel aspirations? Did you sense any underlying hesitation amidst their support?

Pamela Holt:

Yes, you know, I think whenever we make life decisions that are different than what we're currently living, it's always a surprise to people and there's expectations on each and every relationship or friendship, and so when you change that on them, there's always gonna be some hesitation. And while everybody was very supportive, there was that underlying feeling of, oh, you now have to find a new career, since you're not singing anymore, you're in your 40s, you should be married. All these expectations and I had to not only encourage myself but make everybody else believe that I could hit this goal. And then, through my passion of traveling, I started to talk about well, I should create a show on this, because everyone is coming to me saying, wow, you're solo traveling, but you're a girl, I can't believe that you would go to these places. It was always confounding to people that I would travel solo, when actually-.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

Sure, I think most people are like but you're a girl, yes, and they're like you're gonna go where? Do you know what's over there? And I think people allow fear constantly to not only prevent them from experiencing everything life has to offer, but they try to push that onto other people that they care about and they try to project that fear onto you as well.

Pamela Holt:

Absolutely and I think you're 100%. That was so. Many women would smile, but there was that hesitation behind them and I kept saying to them. I said look, don't put your fears on me. I can't take them on. All I can do is inspire and encourage you and show you that I can do it, which ultimately led to me creating this series, because so many women were asking me well, what do you do when you're out there? What do you do when this happens? And so I don't know. I always tell women look, you go an hour away or two hours away and you're fine. 5,000 miles is not going to make a difference. You're still you. You're still making good decisions. You're still the same person, whether you're here or there.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

Right, and I mean a lot of people fear the unknown. But I mean the places that you're going to travel to are no worse than the streets of Seattle, the streets of San Francisco, the streets of Kensington Philadelphia. Right, I mean, kensington Philadelphia looks like a third world country. I mean it's sad to see what's going on there, but you did create the show and that was really cool. One episode from your journey that truly stuck out was your visit to Trader Joe's, a regular grocery store run. That turned into a profound lesson on life. Can you share that transformative, transformative experience with us?

Pamela Holt:

Yeah, that was after my first, that was actually after my first car accident and while it was, it was life changing. I know that you're that from from meeting you and understanding. I know that you understand You're in the same how do I say this? You're in the same idea that the universe kind of teaches you lessons at different times and 100%, and it presents things to you. So after this car accident I had gone, I had bounced from my mom's house for a month and a half to everyone else's houses and I was finally on my own.

Pamela Holt:

Like two, two to three months into it I have this neon pink cast that's literally from my fingertips all the way up to the top of my arm and I'm standing in line at Trader Joe's and this woman taps me on the back, behind me and she said oh, you know what happened. And I said it was a car accident. And she goes what lesson do you feel like you had to learn? And I was like every emotion came into me because I was so mad. It wasn't my fault, I didn't have a lesson to learn, it was someone else's problem. But simultaneously, literally instantaneously, there's this like 17 year old kid in front of me who kept smiling at me and he turns around. He's at the same time. I'm about to answer her and he says Can I sign your cast? And then in the next split second, the cashier at the middle of nowhere comes up with a sharpie and he goes yeah, me too. And suddenly all these people are running over to me to sign my pink neon cast and she ends up waiting like the whole line stops.

Pamela Holt:

It was just this surreal Twilight Zone moment. She waits till the end and she comes up to me to be the last person to sign the cast and I'm ready to let her have it. And, like this wasn't my fault, I don't have anything to learn and she just puts her hand. I remember her touching my hand and she said Somehow, somewhere, you have invited this lesson in. It's your job to look for the lesson and and see what you've learned. And I was probably mad at this stranger for six months and eventually I learned the lesson. I learned a compassion for people. I already had compassion that we we learned naturally, but this was a different level of compassion and understanding and, to be not judgmental, we don't know how somebody got somewhere to the point that they're at today.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

We don't know people's story, and that's, I think that's one of the beauties of meeting new people in conversations, right, I'm a firm believer that conversations are some of the most healing practices that we can have. Because of those experiences, it sheds light on other people's journey through this thing called life, and I think we can pick up so many things from it. It's you know, it's said that our hardest times often lead to the greatest moments of our lives. So how have these experiences because you call them experiences, and I love that how have these experiences reshaped you into a more compassionate and driven individual?

Pamela Holt:

I think when you're faced with losing life or at least living a life you certainly don't want to live, one in pain constantly, one filled with anger and resentment you have to choose. It sounds so easy and it's so hard to do. You just literally have to choose to not be the victim. You have to choose to step into the next chapter. I don't know why you're about to make me cry, but like it's okay, that's what.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

You know what Be vulnerable. We've got to show people that vulnerability is okay. Yeah, it is a choice.

Pamela Holt:

It is a choice.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

That's why I was living in the choice.

Pamela Holt:

Yes, it literally is. Your title is so perfect because it is a choice. Even when you make the choice, there are walls that are going to come up and you're going to have to keep on climbing over them, but you can. I had one accident and that was hard enough to lose everything I lost. And then another, and then another. I'm telling you, I was at my. I want to share this because when people just see my show, they think everything's perfect. I was at my wit and I was thinking of miraculous ways to stop the pain, to stop life. I had gotten that far, the pain was so bad and I'd lost so much. It took this flash. I don't know what brings that flash to some and not to others, but that flash, that moment where you just have to make the choice, that's me, you kind of chew.

Pamela Holt:

Your title is the choice effect and it's like the butterfly effect. You make the choice and then the butterfly effect happens everywhere in your life because you're telling yourselves hey, we're going to do this. And that's when I just made that choice.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

And the thing about that is that, if you look back, every choice that you've ever made has put you where you are, and that's not just if you have a great life.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

People often think, oh, you have a great life. It's easy for you to say, but if you have an unhappy and unfulfilled life, that is also an effect of the choices that you've made. Absolutely, it's just that simple, and it's not to say that we've made choices to have bad things happen to us. You didn't choose to be hit by a car three times, and the way that we respond to it is where our choice lies. We have the choice to how we respond to these obstacles that come in our life, and you can see them as either a setback or you can see them as an opportunity to grow, to learn, to progress and to come out the other side, a more learned individual, and take those lessons from it. Having made such a transformative choice with the 80 by 50 promise, has this influenced the way you make decisions now, and do you feel your appetite for risks has evolved?

Pamela Holt:

Yes, absolutely, I definitely. When you say risks, I interpret that as I live more fully. I definitely take bigger swings in life and I maybe because I just I don't have anything to lose. I've already been down the path of the bottom of the barrel.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

And you know, I think that there's something profound in ways that you don't have anything to lose. And I think, if we can try to make that a ubiquitous mindset because nobody has anything to lose, at the end of the day, this is your life. You get this one run around this globe and you don't have anything to lose. The only thing you have to lose is experience and you'll miss out right. And so if you can somehow lock that in the philosophy that whatever happens to me, it's just a part of the journey, yeah.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

And I think that makes it a little easier to overcome some more of the more difficult things that happen in life and know that on the other side of pain is greatness Right, absolutely. Evolution is experience, and how does that affect the decisions that you make now in life? When you're faced with something, or hardship that pops up or something, do you reflect on it?

Pamela Holt:

I think it's now in my core being to, like I said, take bigger swings. I work harder and more passionately now than I think I ever did before. I always had good work ethic, but going through eight, nine years of pain and coming out the other side of it and making that choice to live has made my life more vibrant and my choices. I don't even want to say more profound, because you make everyday choices, but I just think that it's now in my being to live fuller. I always say just to live, to live bigger. This series I made 457 phone calls and emails to get this.

Pamela Holt:

Oh, yes, I have a spreadsheet that's alphabetical, and every day I got hundreds of notes, if not hundreds, but I mean every day I got tens of notes. And over months and over two years of trying to sell it, I got a lot of notes. But I wasn't looking for the notes, I was just looking for that one.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

yes, that's it, and you just keep going yeah, as many noses as it takes, I'll go through as many noses as I need to to find the yes.

Pamela Holt:

Yes, and every time someone said no, I'd always say well, thank you, because it's one more call I don't have to make.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

Right. And the best part on that is when you do get the yes and you start succeeding. All the people that said no, they just learned a lesson too, that's right, because they're going to tear it.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

I should have said yes, yes, I've experienced that with our cat cafe here in Palm Springs. Not a shameless plug or anything, but on our cat cafe we got turned down by so many properties when we were first looking for a place to put it. No, no, well, they're cats. No, we got turned down by one place because noise ordinances, cats. Yeah, we can't have cats in there. There's a noise ordinance, they're cats.

Pamela Holt:

They're very loud animals. They don't make noise. What?

Sonny Von Cleveland:

They're by definition. They're quiet, right, and so I think it's important to waved through those nos, because a lot of those properties are now seeing the success that is that business, and they're like damn it.

Pamela Holt:

I should have had them here.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

So the streaming series that you have me, myself and the world it's creating waves. Like you've done some good stuff there. What do you hope your viewers absorb from?

Pamela Holt:

that show. Besides inspiration, I want people to be inquisitive about what's around the next corner, what's in the next state, what's in the next country. When you get out and you can explore the world on your own terms and that's what the whole series is about is the art of solo travel. When you solo travel, you build confidence and you discover things about yourself that you didn't even know is inside of you. You're forced to you're with yourself. You have to be with your own thoughts.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

I would imagine it's really empowering as well, right, because you have to make a choice when you're out.

Pamela Holt:

Yeah, you have to be a decision maker and I think a lot of people are armchair travelers. But I'm noticing, even through messaging, that people are sending me. They're inspired by watching the series. Partly they're like, wow, wait a minute, if she can do it, I can do it and that's great. Whatever inspires them to go out and discover the world on their own terms is my motivation and my wish, because what's going to come back to them is that self-discovery, that empowerment and that confidence. I guarantee it. I'll put the pannel hole seal.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

That's right. We all have our touchstones during our journeys. Who were your key inspirations and resources that held you firm during your highs and lows? Were there any people that were like? That's my inspiration.

Pamela Holt:

Yes, I have a couple. Well for sure, my mom, my sister, my family in general were always so supportive to me just in the healing process, and my friends, my friend Heidi, they were always my backbone to really supporting me. There was a book that I absolutely love. It's called Feel the Fear and Do it Anyway. It's by Susan, I think, jeffers. There's something about that book that made me leap. The book really isn't this big, big aha moment, it's just her journey of feeling the fear and do it anyway. But it's the sentiment that has lived inside me that every time I'm afraid oh, I shouldn't go to that place, I shouldn't travel there because I'm alone or I shouldn't do this I just sit in it for a second and say, yeah, it's scary and I'm going to go do it anyway. Do I want to go parachuting? Yep, and I'm going to do it anyway because, hey, who do I have to lose?

Sonny Von Cleveland:

Right and just do it.

Pamela Holt:

You know there was faith. I grew up in a Lutheran family. I lost faith for a long time, especially during the whole car, the whole car experiences, the car accidents, and I always recommend people to find faith. It comes in so many forms but I lost it because I thought it had abandoned me.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

And faith doesn't necessarily mean religion. Nope, it's believing in something more.

Pamela Holt:

Yeah, and believing in yourself. Having faith in yourself there is who knows what kind of makes the world go round. But there's something else, and sometimes it's just faith that it will help you through the next high or the next low or whatever that is. And sometimes I get nervous about even saying that because it isn't a religion thing, like you said, it's just a belief to believe in yourself, to believe that you can find the right answers if you keep making the right choices.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

And I also think that that's also another self-empowering habit. If you develop the habit of faith and belief in yourself, it becomes a habit and I mean you can do such small things to increase that right Little goals that you can set. And when you accomplish those goals, it just reinforces your belief in yourself and your faith in yourself and you get into a winning and accomplishing mindset. And then, yeah, your faith increases, your belief in yourself increases and at the end of the day, that's empowering. And then you get bolder to do more things.

Pamela Holt:

Absolutely, but not. You know. This happens when you solo travel. I meet women all the time who, on their first day, they're so scared, they're such a fish out of water and by the end you know they're not even home yet and they're planning their next trip.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

I mean, I'm inspired, I want to do this. My wife has traveled to 72 countries, I think, and so in her younger years as well, she, you know, she backpacked across Africa, in Europe, and went to, you know, thailand and all these other amazing places, and it sounds like such a personally freeing experience and I've never experienced it and I really, really want to. What is the your favorite traveling experience? Which one, where was it and what was the experience that stands out to you the most?

Pamela Holt:

Oh my gosh. You know, people always ask me my favorite country, but no one's asked me my favorite traveling experience. Wow, I've had so many.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

I mean, I can imagine after being in 80 plus countries you gotta have so many different experiences that were like well, there's this one time in Bali. Well then, there was, you know, often, thailand.

Pamela Holt:

Yeah, oh my gosh. You know, the most recent one was when I was in Bali. I stayed in this. It was an Airbnb house and it was in the middle of a rice paddy I mean literally in the middle of a rice paddy, with nothing close by. And I remember waking up in the morning and it was raining, and so I opened up all the windows and doors and you know, there was an awning, and so I just sat and listened to the rain in Bali and I remember thinking to myself because that was country number 78.

Pamela Holt:

It was right before country 80. I just remember thinking I made it, and I remember listening to the rain and this feeling of accomplishment overcame me and I just sat in that joy and that you're just. You're so overcome by something. But I was so busy traveling I hadn't quite realized. Oh my gosh, I did it. And when I literally landed I landed in Bhutan for my 80th country, on my 50, literally on my 50th birthday and I didn't even walk all the way down the stairs on the airplane, I jumped off. The last day. I was like I'm jumping into my 80th country.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

I'm going to land, I'm jumping into my goal.

Pamela Holt:

Yes, Physically, and I mean there was no Bhutan, If you, if for people who have been there, it's just a very small airport and it was just perfect to land there. That whole it was called my golden Jubilee. I was turning 50. So I called it my golden Jubilee trip and I went to seven countries and Bhutan was my 80th country. But when I got to Bali, there was something about the rain that day that I I just knew I had made it and that I'd fulfilled that goal.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

I love it. Now I don't. I'm not one to focus on negative things I don't focus on negatives but with so many different destinations that you've traveled to, I just got to know what was the worst one, what was the worst place you were at. And you were like I am never coming back to this place. I'm never recommending it, it just sucks.

Pamela Holt:

Okay, in fairness, I've never. I've had some pretty darn bad experiences in my life, from getting detained in a communist country to God knows. I mean there's just there's crazy stuff that have happened and and most of it was my doing it's not just solo travel, it was getting up to something. I've never disliked a destination. I can't say that because the people around the world are so good and they will surprise you. I truly believe that I've had bad experiences. I've been mugged in places, but then I'll tell you the story.

Pamela Holt:

I knew something was going down. I was in a like a petty cab type situation in China and I knew something was going down. I knew they were up to something, so I was prepared for it and I was basically driven to not the place I wanted to go to. And I was ready for them because I just my sixth sense and out of the middle of nowhere that I jump out.

Pamela Holt:

I'm like, trying to defend myself, this cab driver just pulls up out of the middle of nowhere and I don't even know what language he was speaking. All I heard was get in the cab and he never spoke another word of English. So I'm like, how did he happen to know that and I heard him and he saved me, drove me like five blocks, turned around, shook his finger at me like I was in the wrong place and pointed to get out of the car, wouldn't let me pay, and just showed up and I was like, well, I could hate this destination because of those bad people. But now he's just done this really good, solid for me. So there is no bad destination. There's just really good people and a few not so good people.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

Wow and see, and that's what I get for talking about something negative. Right, I just learned another lesson like no, no, there is no bad places. I mean, I've been to some places I don't want to go back to, and not talking about prison, there's a couple of spots in Texas that I will just take the long way around Because it's just there's lots in LA. But you're right, you're 100 percent right, it's not. It's not the destination, it's the mindset.

Pamela Holt:

You know, oh, I love that. It is the mindset what are you attracting with the things that you're expecting?

Sonny Von Cleveland:

And I always say the world. Do you see it as a happy place or do you see it as an unhappy place?

Pamela Holt:

Absolutely the quick little story I was in to give, to give people an idea of just how good people are. I was in the Galapagos Islands and everybody goes to the main island and I happened to choose a water taxi to one of the farthest, most remote islands. No street signs. Well, no streets. No nothing. You know. No TV, no nothing. And I got there. It was a. I had already been traveling for about 10, 12 hours to get there and then I had another three hour boat ride and I had I figured out later that I was getting sick from something I ate back in the Amazon Desert, or sorry, Amazon jungle, but it was just catching up with me and I remember getting off the boat, standing on this dock, Somebody helped me put on my 40, 45 pound backpack and I remember just sort of like looking at these three cab drivers and that was it. That's all I remember. And they said I just toppled over and I could kind of hear them saying like, talking, and I, you know, it's again one of those things where you know they're going. Well, who's going to take her? What do we do with this? There's no hospital, there's no nothing.

Pamela Holt:

I woke up six or seven days later, One of the guys had elected to take me home to his wife and they took care of me. They didn't know me. I was a complete stranger. They took care of me for six or seven days before I woke up Wow and I had gone through my stuff to make sure I wasn't allergic to anything. She looked for like a medical bracelet, which she found. She had found some antibiotics and was trying to wake me up, but she could never get me to wake up enough to take it and she kept my fever down for five or six days and when I finally came to, I had no idea where I was and they, just out of the goodness of their heart, took care of me. That's incredible. We're still friends today. I built them a website and put them up on the open. We're still friends today. Every year we say happy birthday to each other.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

That's incredible. I mean, kindness is in the world, it's out there and again, I think that we have a tendency to attract what we subconsciously see in the world, right. So and I mean that's a touchy subject there because if you're living a happy life and you're seeing the world as kind and you're running around the world doing kind things and kindness befalls you the guy that picked you up in the taxi or the cab and these people that nursed you back to health, right. But if you see the world as a bad place, I'm not even going to go there because I'll probably get a ton of hate mail, but you know it's. I think that we attract what we subconsciously project.

Pamela Holt:

We do, and I have to figure you know, I can look back in retrospect now how and why did I attract that car accident? Sure, there was more than just learning the compassion and understanding at a different level there was.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

It's not victim blame, right, it's not victim blaming. We're not saying that you know, I attract somebody to shoot me because I'm, you know, I think that it's a dangerous and violent area that I'm in. I didn't, you know, somehow pull a bullet to me. But I think there's there's always a lesson there, that what could I have done differently, what could I have, how could I have avoided a certain situation? And it's not to dwell on the past or dwell on the fact that it happened. It's just to mentally prepare myself for moving forward, so that I'm armed with more wisdom and knowledge about how to navigate in the future.

Pamela Holt:

And what is that saying? It's 10%, or you know, 10% of what happened and 90% what you do with it. There's a saying about that.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

I know what you're talking about 10% perception and phrase, but yeah, yeah, it's good. Yeah, Well, as we wrap up this deeply inspiring conversation because I mean, it's just so inspiring it's ridiculous what pearls of wisdom would you offer to our listeners who might be at their crossroads right now and in thinking of something?

Pamela Holt:

I live by the two phrases. One of them leap, let the knit appear. And to feel the fear and do it anyway. If you're in a situation you don't like, it's so scary. Sometimes it's just easier to live in fear or live in pain because at least you know what's coming at you. Sometimes it's hard to break that because it's not something new, but something new can be better with your choices. I love it. If you want to live a better life, leap and let the knit appear, because it will.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

I love that. That's a great way to leave it. Pamela, thank you so much for your time, for sharing your story, for being vulnerable. You're an incredible, incredible woman and I'm excited to see what the future has in store for Pamela Holt.

Pamela Holt:

If people want to, they can follow me at the Pamela Holt on all the social media.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

Make sure you guys check the links here in the description and I will put all of that on there If you'd like to tell them where else they can find you or how they can follow you or contact you or plug away.

Pamela Holt:

Thank you. Please reach out and enjoy my show Me, myself and the World, the art of solo travel streaming on Go Traveler, which it's free over there. It's also free on Amazon Free V, amazon Prime 2B a whole bunch of places. You can catch it on my website, wwwpamelaholtcom. Like I said, follow me on social media at the Pamela Holt.

Sonny Von Cleveland:

I love it. Thank you so much for your time and I look forward to following and seeing what happens.

Pamela Holt:

Thank you.

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